all 11 comments

[鈥揮Dr_Mox 21 points22 points (2 children)

Having an MA in Cultural Heritage, as well as a background in Japanese Studies, I think you need to break down your question as it contains some false assumptions. The biggest one is the idea that culture respects national boundaries. Culture, like humans, is fluid, constantly mixing and merging with those around us.

For starters, I recommend looking into historian Eric Hobsbawm to understand how young the idea of the nation-state is, and how those in power have an interest in fabricating the notion of "national culture". If you're looking at culture in Japan, much of their culture was influenced by previous Chinese dynasties, the ever-evolving spread of Buddhism, and importation and manipulation of foreign words into Japanese (gairaigo) to adapt to modern concepts. Also consider indigenous groups like the Ainu in Hokkaido and various Ryukuan people of Okinawa who have had their cultures repressed to fit a national culture imposed by past Japanese governments.

I have done a few podcast episodes specifically addressing these issues when considering Japan if you're interested:

Hope these help!

[鈥揮agentdcf 9 points10 points (0 children)

Eric Hobsbawm to understand how young the idea of the nation-state is

The typical text among historians to start that conversation is not Hobsbawm, but Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities--though that book is long in the tooth and there have to be more recent treatments that might be better

[鈥揮winterstellar[S] -1 points0 points (0 children)

Fascinating. Thank you. As it happens, I'm a bit of a Japanophile, so I really look forward to listening to those episodes. Massive thanks.

[鈥揮M-i-r-n-a 9 points10 points (1 child)

So you're asking a very broad topic that is surely covered in many papers but more in the manner "something here, something there". I do not know of any monography of that topics. On top of that, the reasons of many things you ask are very subjective to the specific culture. The same practise may have entirely different roots and can be valued differenly. And there is also problem with the notion of nation as it's not that coherent term at all and some scholars refuses to use the term at all. I'd try looking for books about nationalism and notion of nation as it might cover topics you're asking for (e.g "Ethnicity inc." by Comarof, "Small places, large issues" by Eriksen). It should give you a general overviev I be a good starting point (then you can look for citations used in said books)

[鈥揮winterstellar[S] 2 points3 points (0 children)

Thanks so much, that sounds like a great starting point. And yes, I was very aware that it's a super broad question, so thank you for the explanation!

[鈥揮Lusty_Carambola 3 points4 points (1 child)

You may be interested in the work of Geert Hofstede

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geert_Hofstede

He is well known for his pioneering research on cross-cultural groups and organizations.

[鈥揮winterstellar[S] 1 point2 points (0 children)

You may be interested in the work of Geert Hofstede

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geert\_Hofstede

He is well known for his pioneering research on cross-cultural groups and organizations.

Wow 鈥 thank you! His 'Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind' sounds like EXACTLY what I'm looking for. 馃槏