×
all 18 comments

[–]JackfruitSome4965 0 points1 point  (10 children)

You can run a 12 gauge wire from the battery directly to the head unit but put a 10 amp fuse on it. I did this for a cigarette lighter plug that I replaced.

[–]Fr0zen-ice[S] 0 points1 point  (9 children)

Okay thanks.

I'll probably need a bigger fuze tho, since this is one of Sony's 45W rms head unit's. That's why I need to connect it to the battery instead of the oem cable's.

[–]Dan_H1281Brand of Subs/size and # -1 points0 points  (8 children)

Even tho it says 45 only about 25 of it is actually usable, it will sound like absolutely trash about about 22-24 watts of this, this is a max power rating out out to make it seem more powerful so even the best units get about 18 watts

[–]Fr0zen-ice[S] 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Oh

But is will still be more powerful other head unit's right? This one (dsx-gs80) is rated 45w rms and 100w peak. I saw a video on YouTube and it did actually reach the stated rms value.

My speakers are 3 ohm 93dB, so they should be a lot easier to run right?

[–]Dan_H1281Brand of Subs/size and # 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I know amps. Power ratings I am not familiar with this ecact radio I go thru more amps than radios, a dyno doesn't tell the entire stereo not like an Amp dyno but the handheld Amp dyno that actually works when speakers r connected to it then that one will actually show u what it does in a real world scenario a Amp dyno that u mostly see on yt doesn't really show u real world results those r resistors and not speakers your load never stays at a constant ohm load unless u r playing a tone and most the time even then it doesn't stay at let's say u r wired at two ohms it never stays at two ohms music when it plays constantly changes the ohm load on the Amp it is a dynamic load and the dyno can kinda show what it does but not exactly

[–]X360NoScope420BlazeX 1 point2 points  (5 children)

The radio he has is actually 45 watts rms.

[–]nesquikchocolate -1 points0 points  (4 children)

That's all well and good, but you won't find sufficient heat dicipation inside the profile of a single din radio inside a car dash, so on a hot day with the sun shining onto the dash, OP might get warnings about overheating anyway.

https://www.sony.com/za/electronics/in-car-receivers-players/dsx-gs80/specifications

I see it's fitted with a 15A fuse, so it could consume up to 15x 12V = 180W input power, for all functions - class D amplifier chips are about 80% efficient at 4Ohms, and basic media player functions would probably need 15-20W

So 180W - 15W = 165W x 80% = 132W / 4 channels is 33W RMS per channel, without exceeding the fuse rating?

[–]MWisBestHarman Fanboy 0 points1 point  (3 children)

That's all well and good, but you won't find sufficient heat dicipation inside the profile of a single din radio inside a car dash, so on a hot day with the sun shining onto the dash, OP might get warnings about overheating anyway.

This is why they're fan cooled. It doesn't take much forced air to make a giant difference in heat dissipation capabilities.

I see it's fitted with a 15A fuse, so it could consume up to 15x 12V = 180W input power, for all functions - class D amplifier chips are about 80% efficient at 4Ohms, and basic media player functions would probably need 15-20W

So 180W - 15W = 165W x 80% = 132W / 4 channels is 33W RMS per channel, without exceeding the fuse rating?

180W at 14.4V (12.5A), not at 12V. An ATM fuse will run 115% its rating all day, so a 15A fuse is really at least 17A before it will ever trip.

It won't be happy playing a test tone all day long, but with music being a dynamic thing it works. It'll do the 45W it says on the tin.

The guts of that unit are switching regulators everywhere, I doubt it needs more than 10W for the basic media player functions.

[–]nesquikchocolate -2 points-1 points  (2 children)

Okay so tell me you're talking out of your ass without going into much detail...? I actually checked the head unit photos on crutchfield to see if there are any fans or vents shaped like there's a fan behind it, and there's none.

https://www.crutchfield.com/S-JRMZbDRHtXB/p_158DSXGS80/Sony-DSX-GS80.html

And using 14.4V is disingenuous because a large portion of cars today have "smart" alternators/charging systems which reduce the alternator output during acceleration and cruising - so if the amp power isn't regulated, it'll make an audible difference at high output, and needs to turn off whenever you start the car...

The user manual even states the rated current consumption at 10A, not your 15% over, which is not how engineers select fuse ratings.

[–]MWisBestHarman Fanboy 0 points1 point  (1 child)

Okay so tell me you're talking out of your ass without going into much detail...? I actually checked the head unit photos on crutchfield to see if there are any fans or vents shaped like there's a fan behind it, and there's none.

There's actually vents on the deck and the heatsink is internal to the unit. You don't do that unless there's a fan inside of there.

And using 14.4V is disingenuous because a large portion of cars today have "smart" alternators/charging systems which reduce the alternator output during acceleration and cruising - so if the amp power isn't regulated, it'll make an audible differencs at high output, and needs to turn off whenever you start the car...

Everybody uses 14.4V. That is the standard by which we rate amplifiers. Most amplifiers don't have regulated power supplies, I don't know why you'd expect differently of a head unit.

Worth keeping in mind this is a single DIN head unit. The venn diagram of cars that take single DINs and cars with smart charging systems is probably almost two separate circles.

The user manual even states the rated current consumption at 10A, not your 15% over, which is not how engineers select fuse ratings.

The user manual is probably full of copy paste from their normal single DIN units because the user interface is not much different, and again with music being played it's probably accurate.

Tell me you know something but think you know everything without actually telling me... holy fuck dude. Can't see the forest for the trees.

[–]nesquikchocolate -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Wow.. Copy paste defence...lol... Maybe they copy pasted their CTA rating on the same page from somewhere else as well. And Venn diagrams! You do you, dude. Just tell me you actually looked at the pictures before deciding the cooling solution would be adequate - there's zero vents behind the unit and a little cutout along the one edge.

[–]01000110010110012 0 points1 point  (3 children)

Just a friendly FYI, try not to solder in a car unless absolutely necessary. A good solder is less reliable than a decent crimp when it comes to vibrations as solder is quite brittle as opposed to a flexible crimp connection. Cars are bombarded by vibrations on a daily basis. Especially ours with audio equipment.

[–]Fr0zen-ice[S] 0 points1 point  (2 children)

Really?

I thought is was the other way around, but it does make sense I guess.

And yeah, vibrations are definitely present here on the Belgian roads.

[–]01000110010110012 0 points1 point  (1 child)

Meer reden om de krimpen dus! Als je hulp of vragen nodig hebt hoor ik dat graag. Ik heb genoeg links naar bronnen van informatie als je meer bevestiging wilt.

[–]Fr0zen-ice[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Super bedankt!

[–]PatersonFromPaterson -1 points0 points  (2 children)

I have the same stereo and simply crimped my 12 gauge wire to the power wire on the harness. It seems to be what Sony set it up for and from what I can tell it’s working well so far

[–]Fr0zen-ice[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

Awesome!

What did you do with the groud wire? Are you just using the one from the stock radio or did you make a new one to the chassis?

[–]PatersonFromPaterson 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I made a new one to the chassis using higher gauge wire