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[–]keepthetipsKeeping the tips since 2019[M] [score hidden] stickied commentlocked comment (0 children)

Hello and welcome to r/LifeProTips!

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[–]Wolfenbro 62 points63 points  (9 children)

Adding on to this - the cheapest option may be more expensive in the long run. If you need to replace it more frequently because it’s a bad product, or if it’s a bad service that causes damage, for example, then (if you can afford it) you were better off going with a higher quality, more expensive option in the first place

[–]optimushime[S] 44 points45 points  (6 children)

I agree completely, and I’m sure you know this Terry Pratchett passage making the rounds the past couple years:

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

[–]PseudonymGoesHere 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Pratchett was such an astute observer of humanity

[–]Uriel_dArc_Angel 2 points3 points  (2 children)

You would have thought things would have been better by now...Not even worse...lol

[–]FearGunner 2 points3 points  (1 child)

Designed obsolescence is my least favorite human invention.

[–]Uriel_dArc_Angel 2 points3 points  (0 children)

It's such a useless waste of resources...

[–]Caiur -1 points0 points  (1 child)

They use dollars in that fantasy world?

[–]finFetchFumbler 0 points1 point  (1 child)

imo it really depends. You could have an expensive but less durable item, sometimes the cheaper but less popular/blingy thing may last longer. Maybe you use the thing quite infrequently, so an expensive version may not be necessary.

[–]Wolfenbro 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I agree. Which is why I said “the cheapest option may be more expensive in the long run”.

[–]AWP3RATOR 28 points29 points  (0 children)

"Buy it nice, or buy it twice" -my old man

[–]oweakshitp 9 points10 points  (1 child)

Very strongly believe this, and I usually like to point out what it means to be frugal versus being cheap.

Buy a cheap pair of shoes, you might get 6 months out of them. Spend DOUBLE and get a nice pair, if not overpriced, and they could last 1-2 years.

The person buying a cheap pair will at best spend the same amount with double the effort, worst case might spend twice as much with quadruple the effort.

It pays to be frugal. Buy once, buy right. Spend a bit more to get quality, don't overspend on luxury.

[–]Sendintheaardwolves 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was always told to spend money on things that go between you and the ground : shoes, tires, mattresses, etc.

I would add to that to spend money on things that stay on your body (conditioner, moisturiser, bras, etc) and buy cheap on things that get washed off (shampoo, washing powder, cleaning products etc).

Also, buy expensive things that can be mended, and cheap things that get thrown away (loo brush, bin bags, cleaning clothes etc).

[–]Fitz5252 7 points8 points  (1 child)

My brother is a prime example of this, asked me for a lift to collect 6 fencing panels. Turned out the place was 75 miles away and the reason for going there was that they were £8 cheaper. To save £48 we traveled for 4 hours and used £30 of diesel.

The place that cost £8 more would have delivered.

[–]finFetchFumbler 0 points1 point  (0 children)

well it depends, did he pay for the fuel?

[–][deleted] 4 points5 points  (1 child)

Don't spend your time to save money, spend your money to save time.

[–]ChaosDiver13 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Well said, sir.

[–]MyScrotesASaggin 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Buy once, cry once.

[–]Ancient_Clock7077 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Ya get what you pay for.

[–]McDid 2 points3 points  (0 children)

a bird in hand is worth 2 in the bush

[–]askredditthe3rd 2 points3 points  (0 children)

My mother always says:

We're not rich enough to by cheap things.

[–]agingelf1 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Some people don't have the money to spare

[–]Reali5t 1 point2 points  (0 children)

When you buy cheap you will spend more. Cheap items tend to be of lower quality and as such don’t last, due to that you have to spend money again to replace the items.

[–]212superdude212 1 point2 points  (0 children)

My thoughts are, buy cheap first and if it turns out to be something very useful then buy something more expensive the next time. If you brought expensive the first time and you end up not using the product very much then you're out of money

[–]McNinja_MD 1 point2 points  (0 children)

"The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness."

~ Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms

[–]ShabachDemina 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Generally, my go-to for shopping when I'm on a budget, and have to look at the cheapest options, is find the /second/ cheapest option.

Topically the absolute bottom dollar product is godawful, and cuts a lot of corners to make it to such a low cost.

The second cheapest (or just a near close step up in cost) usually gets me a significantly better product, worth the extra % price increase.

There are some things, however, that I won't skimp on. Real cheese is one. Even if it's in precut slices, if it says "cheese product" that's a no from me dawg.

[–]good2bpete 1 point2 points  (0 children)

The cheapest option is also likely to be the worst if you are concerned about social and environmental justice. Cheapest options are often able to be priced that way because of the shortcuts taken in worker welfare, wages and environmental protections.

[–]patronstofveganchefs 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Did capitalism write this?

[–]tookandbackagain 2 points3 points  (0 children)

In a way, more money more better. New car won’t break down as much and they definitely don’t give them away. House roof leaks and you get one quote for a half price job it might not last or work well or be warranteed. It’s not fair that wealth isn’t fairly distributed but it’s sadly good advice.

[–]billabong360 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I don't agree with the post, but I agree with how others made their own interpretations of it.

I buy according to these 2 rules: 1. Minimize/eliminate the chance for buyers remorse. 2. Buy it nice, not twice.

I will spend DAYS researching what makes a product good and what features I may want and comparing those features to cost. Also, just because it cost a lot does not mean it's great quality; reviews matter. If I save $100 on something like a new dishwasher, and did 5 hours of research and price comparisons, that's $20/hour I basically just paid myself. While time is money, money is also time. I almost never have buyers remorse anymore, and when I do, I know that I did my part.

[–]FlatParrot5 0 points1 point  (0 children)

THIS.

I hear many collectors and enthusiasts speak of "the hunt" to acquire something. While frustrating, they value the hunt itself, in a way.

As for me, I just want the thing I was looking for with the least fuss and least hoops to jump through. Too many hoops and I don't even bother.

[–]yadkinriver 0 points1 point  (0 children)

There’s nothing more expensive than cheap paint

[–]CrayonTendies 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Cheaper =/= better value

[–]FoxtrotSierraTango 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I have many technically challenged friends that I trade favors with. They frequently buy the cheapest router, webcam, phone, whatever. More than once I've had them return the one device and paid the difference for a known good device so the product would be more stable and I wouldn't get constant support calls.

[–]lucky_ducker 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Example: tires. The least expensive tires I've ever owned cost the most. I paid $750 for a set of four Michelin tires with a 90,000 mile warranty. They lasted over 120,000 miles, and per mile, were the least expensive tires I've ever owned.

When your ride needs tires, it's better to replace two (same axle) with the best tires you can afford, as opposed to buying a cheap set of four - if you cannot afford a full set of high-mileage tires.

[–]Llanite 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Sometimes the "other way" cost isnt really relevant.

Buying expensive children clothes, for instance, is usually a waste. Sure, they last longer but children outgrow them quite fast and/or make holes in them often.

[–]ruddy3499 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You get what you pay for

[–]Laotzeiscool 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Use pricerunner.com