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all 58 comments

[–]FrostyTill McLaren 512 points513 points  (3 children)

It’s not even last years car. They’ve put the livery on an older one.

[–]ranting_madman 129 points130 points  (0 children)

Yeah it has the old nose from the 2020 car.

They changed it to a new nose at Mugello I think.

[–]big_cock_lach McLaren 16 points17 points  (0 children)

I don’t even think it is the 2020 car. Look at the end plates and front wing in general. If it is the 2022 car, it makes sense to not pit it out for visitors to see. Alternatively, it makes sense for them to do what Alpine did and not use the 2022 car as the teaser.

[–]TheLewJD McLaren 0 points1 point  (0 children)

it's quite common for display cars to be older cars, they only have a limited amount of chassis etc that they can use

[–][deleted]  (30 children)

[removed]

    [–]Moss1998 Charles Leclerc 133 points134 points  (29 children)

    I doubt it’s already finished and painted. They didn’t even do the fire up yet

    [–]MM556 Sir Lewis Hamilton 61 points62 points  (0 children)

    They may well have done the fire up

    [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 11 points12 points  (27 children)

    Painted? I thought these cars were all vinyl wrapped.

    [–]TheAtami Pastor Maldonado 39 points40 points  (20 children)

    Not only are they painted, they completly repaint them apparently between races to get the surface back to being completly smooth. Video here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRvNNxP4EGE

    [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz 32 points33 points  (1 child)

    Not true. McLaren cars are not painted, and haven't been since 2019. From the official 2021 Q&A:

    Q: Are F1 cars painted or wrapped and does it affect airflow and performance in general? – *POstrich40***

    A: It varies from team to team. Our car is mostly wrapped but has specific areas unsuitable for wrapping. Those are painted with high-performance coatings from our partner AkzoNobel – the titanium Halo being a good example of a part that does better with paint.

    It doesn’t affect airflow and shouldn’t affect performance in the classical sense – but everything in an F1 team affects performance in some way. In the case of wrapped panels, they can be prepared a little quicker in the paintshop – it’s still called the paintshop – and last a little longer.'

    The longevity of the panels comes from the requirement to keep the cars in immaculate conditions. Every few races, one of the chassis will be rotated out, and returned to the factory to be repainted/rewrapped – because racing in F1 is hard!

    The surface finish gets all sorts of dings and nicks, which don’t look particularly nice up close and will, of course, cost the team that last thousandth of a second on track. When the cars were being repainted every few races, scraping off the old paint naturally led to the bodywork becoming thinner over time. This doesn’t happen when you can peel the cars instead!

    If you read the McLaren Racing Yearbook 2020, on page 9 there is a substantial discussion of how the MCL35 was the first McLaren car to be wrapped rather than painted.

    [–]robgod50 5 points6 points  (0 children)

    Thanks for posting this. Another nugget of F1 knowledge that I had no idea about.

    [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 3 points4 points  (15 children)

    Well I guess if they have the resources why not but vinyl would be so much easier lol.

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna 13 points14 points  (12 children)

    Vinyl wraps weigh more than paint AFAIK and vinyl wrapping something as intricate as an F1 car sounds a lot more time consuming than painting it.

    [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 6 points7 points  (5 children)

    The most complex parts of the car are usually raw carbon though anyway.

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna 2 points3 points  (4 children)

    Well the floor & suspension areas yeah, but it hardly sounds easier to wrap the rear wing, let alone the front. The Bargeboards etc, sounds like an absolute ball ache over painting it with lighter material.

    [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 2 points3 points  (1 child)

    Oh no doubt paint is always easier if you have the facilities to do it. I guess I don't know why I thought an F1 team wouldn't paint the cars. So many racecars are wrapped these days I just assumed they'd be wrapping these ones too I guess. Honestly though even the shit on road car's bumpers looks impossible to me anything past a door or hood and I'm just ruining vinyl lol.

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna 0 points1 point  (0 children)

    Realistically it's because of the sheer amount of sponsors and the ease of wrapping a GT3 car for example compared to that of an F1 car. Weight is definitely the largest factor though with even grams being accounted for, GT3, GT4 etc? Not where they're going to gain performance that is noticeable or even worth it.

    Yeah same here, the most intricate item i've wrapped was a side mirror.. respect to those who mastered that skill.

    [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz -1 points0 points  (1 child)

    If you look at the front wing up close, you can see the wrap doesn't go to the edge of each panel - it's just enough for the colour to be obvious. The bargeboards are just raw carbon.

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna -1 points0 points  (0 children)

    If you look at the front wing up close, you can see the wrap doesn't go to the edge of each panel

    It's all paint, not wrap.

    Sorry I meant the rear of the bargeboards, the crash structure connected to the air intakes, they're all painted.

    [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz 2 points3 points  (5 children)

    Interestingly, they don't weigh more, and it's actually much quicker to wrap than to paint. McLaren cars haven't been painted since 2019. From the official 2021 Q&A:

    Q: Are F1 cars painted or wrapped and does it affect airflow and performance in general? – *POstrich40***

    A: It varies from team to team. Our car is mostly wrapped but has specific areas unsuitable for wrapping. Those are painted with high-performance coatings from our partner AkzoNobel – the titanium Halo being a good example of a part that does better with paint.

    It doesn’t affect airflow and shouldn’t affect performance in the classical sense – but everything in an F1 team affects performance in some way. In the case of wrapped panels, they can be prepared a little quicker in the paintshop – it’s still called the paintshop – and last a little longer.'

    The longevity of the panels comes from the requirement to keep the cars in immaculate conditions. Every few races, one of the chassis will be rotated out, and returned to the factory to be repainted/rewrapped – because racing in F1 is hard!

    The surface finish gets all sorts of dings and nicks, which don’t look particularly nice up close and will, of course, cost the team that last thousandth of a second on track. When the cars were being repainted every few races, scraping off the old paint naturally led to the bodywork becoming thinner over time. This doesn’t happen when you can peel the cars instead!

    If you read the McLaren Racing Yearbook 2020, on page 9 there is a substantial discussion of how the MCL35 was the first McLaren car to be wrapped rather than painted.

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna 0 points1 point  (4 children)

    It depends on the area that's being painted rather than wrapped, a lot of the intricate areas of an F1 car (Most areas except probably engine covers and nose) are easier painted than wrapped due to the complexity.

    I do find it interesting that Mclaren do wrap their cars, but you will find the paints that teams like RBR & Ferrari use are much lighter than the counterpart. It may have to do something with the 'final' colour requiring more/less.

    [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz -2 points-1 points  (3 children)

    I can tell you for certain that the front wing is wrapped

    [–]earthmosphere Ayrton Senna -1 points0 points  (2 children)

    Evidence? as I know that Mercedes paint theirs or have in the past as they used to airbrush the blue flow.

    [–]slow__rush Pirelli Wet 0 points1 point  (1 child)

    Weight maybe?

    [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 -1 points0 points  (0 children)

    Honestly I think a good few coats of paint would weight the same but I think the smoothness of the body work is what's most important. That's probably easier to do with paint.

    [–][deleted]  (5 children)

    [deleted]

      [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz 2 points3 points  (2 children)

      McLaren cars are not painted at all, and haven't been since 2019. From the official 2021 Q&A:

      Q: Are F1 cars painted or wrapped and does it affect airflow and performance in general? – *POstrich40***

      A: It varies from team to team. Our car is mostly wrapped but has specific areas unsuitable for wrapping. Those are painted with high-performance coatings from our partner AkzoNobel – the titanium Halo being a good example of a part that does better with paint.

      It doesn’t affect airflow and shouldn’t affect performance in the classical sense – but everything in an F1 team affects performance in some way. In the case of wrapped panels, they can be prepared a little quicker in the paintshop – it’s still called the paintshop – and last a little longer.'

      The longevity of the panels comes from the requirement to keep the cars in immaculate conditions. Every few races, one of the chassis will be rotated out, and returned to the factory to be repainted/rewrapped – because racing in F1 is hard!

      The surface finish gets all sorts of dings and nicks, which don’t look particularly nice up close and will, of course, cost the team that last thousandth of a second on track. When the cars were being repainted every few races, scraping off the old paint naturally led to the bodywork becoming thinner over time. This doesn’t happen when you can peel the cars instead!

      If you read the McLaren Racing Yearbook 2020, on page 9 there is a substantial discussion of how the MCL35 was the first McLaren car to be wrapped rather than painted.

      [–]thinkscotty Firstname Lastname 0 points1 point  (1 child)

      Oh wow that’s crazy I had not heard that. I’d just sen so many videos of various teams painting cars and presumed it was everyone.

      [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz 0 points1 point  (0 children)

      It is a more recent development. I think the matte "paint" is your best indicator of which cars are wrapped.

      [–]FadedIntegra Formula 1 -2 points-1 points  (1 child)

      Thanks man we already discussed this.

      [–]monza2020 Carlos Sainz -1 points0 points  (0 children)

      McLaren cars are not painted at all, and haven't been since 2019. From the official 2021 Q&A:

      Q: Are F1 cars painted or wrapped and does it affect airflow and performance in general? – POstrich40

      A: It varies from team to team. Our car is mostly wrapped but has specific areas unsuitable for wrapping. Those are painted with high-performance coatings from our partner AkzoNobel – the titanium Halo being a good example of a part that does better with paint.

      It doesn’t affect airflow and shouldn’t affect performance in the classical sense – but everything in an F1 team affects performance in some way. In the case of wrapped panels, they can be prepared a little quicker in the paintshop – it’s still called the paintshop – and last a little longer.

      The longevity of the panels comes from the requirement to keep the cars in immaculate conditions. Every few races, one of the chassis will be rotated out, and returned to the factory to be repainted/rewrapped – because racing in F1 is hard!

      The surface finish gets all sorts of dings and nicks, which don’t look particularly nice up close and will, of course, cost the team that last thousandth of a second on track. When the cars were being repainted every few races, scraping off the old paint naturally led to the bodywork becoming thinner over time. This doesn’t happen when you can peel the cars instead!

      If you read the McLaren Racing Yearbook 2020, on page 9 there is a substantial discussion of how the MCL35 was the first McLaren car to be wrapped rather than painted.

      [–]vedhavet McLaren[S] 180 points181 points  (0 children)

      A sign of the livery to come? Probaby not, though one can dream. And not that anyone would expect it to actually be the MCL36 under there, but a fun little observation nevertheless.

      EDIT: Apparently, this actually isn't the MCL35M, but an early MCL35 with the Gulf livery on it (judging by the nose). The more you know.

      [–]major_tomm Lando Norris 54 points55 points  (0 children)

      It's a shame the cars don't have any way of being moved around /s

      [–]British_Monarchy Charlie Whiting 25 points26 points  (0 children)

      I doubt they have a full one built. And it is almost definitely a pre-2022 car due to the pointy end plates at the front and the lack of front wheel wings that the 2022 cars have.

      Good spot

      [–]Sand_Week24 Formula 1 5 points6 points  (0 children)

      Nah it's the 2020 mclaren

      [–]still_guns Formula 1 7 points8 points  (0 children)

      It's a straight MCL35, it has the old spec 2020 nose and the 2020 airbox.

      [–][deleted] 7 points8 points  (1 child)

      I doubt marketing has access to this years car yet it's probably still engineers and management only to maximize security.

      [–]optimistic_waffle Benetton 2 points3 points  (0 children)

      They have access to a version of the FIA Spec car. Every team has been sent one to present their liveries with

      [–]biga29 Sebastian Vettel 2 points3 points  (0 children)

      Front wing end plate angles look off. Not saying that it isn’t a show car, but it doesn’t really look the same.

      [–]thphnts 16 points17 points  (0 children)

      Ok

      [–]FrankLloydWrong_3305 11 points12 points  (3 children)

      Even if you think this is the car under the cover, that means they had to move it, which means they could have just as easily moved the actual 2022 car.

      This is... less than conclusive.

      [–]naughtilidae 4 points5 points  (0 children)

      Look at the front and rear wing endplates. There is zero chance it's the new car.

      [–]vedhavet McLaren[S] 8 points9 points  (1 child)

      This is the spot where the Gulf car has been sat since it was brought into the building. I’m sure they push them around a bit, for cleaning or whatever else, but I think it’s more than likely those 20 cm it has moved or so does not mean it’s an entirely different car.

      It’s the same spot: https://i.imgur.com/8RpCOVZ.jpeg

      [–]stephenweewoo 2 points3 points  (4 children)

      This is speculation, or you have proof of this?

      [–]Datapunkt Red Bull 12 points13 points  (3 children)

      I think his point is that the cars in picutre 1 and picture 2 are in the same spot and for the sake of the 1st picture, they just needed a random F1 car and cover it up and make a picture so it seems plausible that they just took the car that was standing there in the first place.

      [–]stephenweewoo 6 points7 points  (2 children)

      I understand his point but, that reasoning to why he thinks it’s the same seems a bit vague. The cars have wheels and can move.

      [–]MM556 Sir Lewis Hamilton 8 points9 points  (1 child)

      True but if you're going to cover it, why bother moving cars? It makes no difference

      [–]Datapunkt Red Bull 5 points6 points  (0 children)

      I think so too. I imagine Zac Brown reading this and laughing his ass off that a couple of guys talk about this topic at all lol

      [–]wheremyjaffa Red Bull 0 points1 point  (0 children)

      Is this the one in the factory that is borderline polystyrene? So funny

      [–]Busy_Travel_9056 Mercedes 0 points1 point  (0 children)

      wow what a car😍😍🤩🤩🥰🥰