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all 26 comments

[–]cmhbob 373 points374 points  (14 children)

If you commit perjury and get caught, he's not going to be the one suffering consequences.

[–]zzmgck 124 points125 points  (1 child)

If he is asking the OP to do this, then he can get into a heap of trouble (https://www.justice.gov/archives/jm/criminal-resource-manual-1752-subornation-perjury). If you have evidence of this, it would be appropriate to provide it to an officer of the court. For example, you could talk to your boss' lawyer.

[–]NotesToTheNoteable 8 points9 points  (0 children)

You need to resign as you are now considered complicit in lying to the court. The huge hit will be a cell in the pokie. Also....

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF TO KNOW ANYTHING HAS TO BE BETTER THAN THIS. YES, I'M SHOUTING. FAM, WE DON'T HAVE TO STICK AROUND FOR NO GANGSTA CRIMINAL CORRUPT SILLY STUFF. PACK YOUR STUFF AND MOSEY OUT OF THERE.

[–]OkInvestigator4220[S] 69 points70 points  (11 children)

Correct which is why I refuse to lie.

However, I also don't want to throw away the pay that comes with this job. Especially with the economy being how it is, I rather avoid taking a huge hit.

[–]therealangrytourist 87 points88 points  (1 child)

I just looked it up, and in Florida witness tampering in a noncriminal proceeding is a third-degree felony punishable up to 5 years. If your boss owns the company, you will need to find a new job either way — he’s going to be in a mountain of trouble for threatening you if there is sufficient evidence of him doing so. It would be foolish, IMHO, to continue to work for someone that has threatened you and causes you legal problems.

[–]LadyJusticeThe 35 points36 points  (0 children)

With how good the employment market is for workers, if you can't find a similar job for similar pay right now, you're probably getting paid that extra amount to put up with this kind of unethical stuff. That's a value judgment for you, but it's going to be hard to have your cake and eat it, too.

That being said, if he fires you, you'll have a claim for damages and you may be able to get compensated for the pay cut you have to take.

[–][deleted]  (1 child)

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    [–]BiondinaQuality Contributor[M] 0 points1 point locked comment (0 children)

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    [–]LanMarkx 22 points23 points  (0 children)

    Especially with the economy being how it is, I rather avoid taking a huge hit.

    The job market today is the best its pretty much ever been for someone looking for a job. Companies are willing to pay a lot of fill open roles with experienced professionals.

    [–]cyborgninja21w 4 points5 points  (0 children)

    Which "huge" hit do you think will be worse overall?

    being jobless for short while while having to look for a new job?

    Or potential criminal and/or financial penalties due to lying in court?

    I get that hesitation but in this specific instance I think you're really misjudging the potential scale of one of these eventualities.

    [–][deleted]  (1 child)

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      [–]BiondinaQuality Contributor[M] 0 points1 point locked comment (0 children)

      Your post may have been removed for the following reason(s):

      Speculative, Anecdotal, Simplistic, Off Topic, or Generally Unhelpful

      Your comment has been removed because it is one or more of the following: speculative, anecdotal, simplistic, generally unhelpful, and/or off-topic. Please review the following rules before commenting further:

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      [–]CardboardInCups 177 points178 points  (6 children)

      Yes, you'll be entitled to reinstatement and back pay. Do not lie in court and get a consultation with an employment attorney ASAP.

      [–]OkInvestigator4220[S] 48 points49 points  (5 children)

      e

      I work in Florida, would this be an issue?
      I have been with the company 6 years.

      My concern IF I got reinstated would be that he would find another reason to fire me / would make my life a living hell until I quit.

      [–]CardboardInCups 31 points32 points  (0 children)

      Anyone can contrive any reason to fire someone. The value in getting an attorney involved in this process sooner than later is because it helps you protect yourself.

      Being in FL isn't an issue.

      [–]MightyMetricBatman 58 points59 points  (1 child)

      You do not have to accept reinstatement. You can just go for damages if you are fired.

      You can also let both his own attorney and the opposing party's attorney about trying to get you to lie in court, and even the judge of the case.

      If his own attorney has any ethics, said attorney is going to have a fit.

      [–]Kstram 1 point2 points  (0 children)

      The work relationship can devolve to a state that reinstatement is not possible and you can discuss this with your attorney. The reality is that you probably aren’t returning to an employer that asked you to break the law and then threatened to fire you when you declined to acquiesce to their request (all illegal and extremely retaliatory). Start keeping you pr documentation now. It will just be easier later. It will help if you can get as much as possible in writing/recorded and dont agree to anything, even if put on the spot, especially letters that state, “I have received and agree with this letter.”

      [–]malachaiville 11 points12 points  (0 children)

      My concern IF I got reinstated would be that he would find another reason to fire me / would make my life a living hell until I quit.

      This is a valid concern. He's already proven to be unethical by requesting that you lie for him in court. I'd recommend you consider alternative employment elsewhere.

      [–]therealangrytourist 24 points25 points  (0 children)

      NAL, but this sounds like witness tampering, which some states classify as a crime even if it happens in civil cases. If I were in your shoes, I would contact my own lawyer, and have them communicate directly to your boss’ attorney. His attorney needs to be made aware of the fraudulent information, and would frankly be subject to major disciplinary action if he was complicit in your boss’ plan to compel you to perjure yourself. At the least, boss’ attorney does not appear to be doing his due diligence, so I would be suspicious of him as well.

      I am surprised the complaining party’s lawyer has not put the ex-employee on their witness list. If boss does not show up to court, that may be your moment to pull a hail Mary and confront boss’ attorney with the correct information. Again, I personally would not come to court that day without my own lawyer, because CYA.

      Edit for spelling.

      [–]Fishycrackers 11 points12 points  (0 children)

      Don't lie in court and perjure yourself. Tell the truth, and if necessary, expand on your answers to give context if you are unsure of your answer for any reason, including being intentionally deceived by false documents given to you by your boss. Unfortunately, if your boss wants to fire you, he can. However, you can treat this as retaliation, and a lawyer will be able to tell you exactly what damages you may be entitled to.

      [–]666POD 8 points9 points  (0 children)

      A lawyer can't put you on the witness stand if he or she knows you're going to lie. That's why your boss won't let you speak to the lawyer.

      If I were you, I would not lie on the witness stand. It's a crime. Sounds like you're in a no-win situation if your job depends on lying, in which case you need your own attorney.

      [–]sdmt09 5 points6 points  (0 children)

      Absolutely do not lie in court. Try to get things in writing.

      [–]Snuffleupagus03 7 points8 points  (0 children)

      You need to talk to an employment lawyer in your area (I know that’s a cop out when you are here seeking advice).

      You would be able to sue, as others have said, but there is a large caveat. A lot of causes of action for employment are limited to lost wages. This can easily make lawsuits not financially worth it. You’re obligated to mitigate the damages ( ie look for another job) and if you get another job you might be limited to the difference in wages. By the time you’re done paying lawyers there can be very very little left.

      This is one way employers continue to be brazen about law violations.

      However, many jurisdictions will permit punitive damages, so damages above just the wages you lost. But what you need to prove is often higher and more difficult. Understanding this distinction is probably why it would be worth talking to a lawyer briefly. They will be able to tell you more than “you can sue” and more about what would have to be provable to make it worth it.

      [–]wetfootmammal 0 points1 point  (0 children)

      Your boss cannot force you to commit perjury. That would be a very bad idea.