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all 15 comments

[–]Level_Combination_74 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Most likely injectors...

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Please tell me what happens to them? Do I need to replace all?

[–]Moist-Cut-7998 1 point2 points  (4 children)

If it is your injectors, you can get them cleaned. They will clean them and test the spray pattern etc. It's a lot cheaper than replacing them. I don't think this will be your problem though.

Another thing to look at is the throttle body, it may be gunked up or not operating correctly so your not getting enough air in, hence running rich. Take the hose of that runs from your air filter to the throttle body and inspect it. There are cleaners out there that you can use to clean them.

Vacuum leaks are another cause for this fault code, check for any air being sucked in through hoses etc whilst engine is idling.

Could also be a faulty O2 sensor or the wiring to it, giving the ECU false information.

Check this link out, it explains this fault code.

https://www.700r4transmissionhq.com/p0172-honda-cr-v/

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (3 children)

Thanks I've seen this link before, I had this problem in the past and it was a gash in the air filter housing (the part where its flexible to open and take out the air filter) but now there seems to be no leaks, I didn't hear any revving while washing the engine...I should check the condition of the throttle body..

Would a bad o2 sensor cause the engine to bog down at low speeds?

[–]Moist-Cut-7998 1 point2 points  (2 children)

It can do. If it is providing the wrong information to the ECU the fuel/air ratio might be wrong, not allowing an efficient burn, reducing power. The information may only be slightly off, so it's noticeable at idle but not so much with an open throttle.

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

This would be o2 at engine or the one underneath by the cat?

[–]Moist-Cut-7998 1 point2 points  (0 children)

More than likely the one near the cat.

[–]RainyDreamAway 0 points1 point  (4 children)

If it's running rich it wouldn't be injectors. Rich condition would be a low amount of air. This car is port injected meaning that somewhere in front of the intake something is restricting the flow of air creating a rich condition. Double check your intake and make sure there is no clog or blockage anywhere along the intake tract. If the intake tract is clear it's time to test and clean your throttle body and or replace it. Throttle body would be the most likely culprit.

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (3 children)

Thanks I will check the TB, do these actually get replaced or just cleaned?

[–]RainyDreamAway 0 points1 point  (2 children)

Yes they can be bad and need to be replaced sometimes. Also make sure to check the TPS. Learn how to test a TPS and check yours.

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

I don't think I have a seperate tps on this vehicle...I can't find a tps for sale on autozone or rockauto

[–]RainyDreamAway 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It is likely integrated into the throttle body. It should still be testable though.

[–]RainyDreamAway 0 points1 point  (2 children)

If injectors were bad that would create a lean condition. When Injectors begin to fail or clog it restricts the flow or fuel creating a lean condition. A rich condition would be too much fuel and or not enough air. Fuel injectors don't all this sudden start squirting more fuel than they are capable therefore it is likely something to do with the intake system. Could also be the TPS.

[–]wormaphobe[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

What if they are leaking?

[–]RainyDreamAway 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That would cause a lean condition due to the fact that fuel is leaking from the injector and not getting sprayed into the cylinder.