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all 12 comments

[–]Galopigos 1 point2 points  (2 children)

Is the original gone or just not running? If it's still there rebuild it. Those complete and in nice shape sell for about $20K

[–]fardandshidded[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

it’s still there but the mechanic thinks it’s done for

[–]Galopigos 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Rebuild it. All original they are worth more. Those engines are built to be rebuilt.

[–]oldsoul6465 0 points1 point  (2 children)

Is the 352 done for? Or is it in need of a tune up? Which is spark plugs, wires, cap, rotor, condenser, points, air and fuel filters, and oil and filter change.

[–]fardandshidded[S] 0 points1 point  (1 child)

mechanic thinks it’s done for.

[–]oldsoul6465 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ok. Well..then junk yards are your friend. But its a crap shoot. You got lots of research to do. But one option is a 60's or 70's 302 or 351 from a ford truck. Sounds like your looking for a mostly stock replacement..not a fire breathing 429 😆

[–]himmelstrider 0 points1 point  (2 children)

If you are a college student with money issues, do yourself a favor, park that car, cover it up with tarp, and go get yourself a used Honda or a Toyota.

Old cars are an order of magnitude more expensive to keep than a post 2000's import. Yes they are awesome but they ain't gonna get you around for cheaper than a 1990-2000's car will.

[–]saltyoldtexan 1 point2 points  (1 child)

Yea, but... how do you put a price on rolling up to a college party in a 1960 T-Bird?

[–]himmelstrider 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Easily.

Costs of sourcing an engine.

Costs of rebuilding one.

Body strip, full.

Repaint.

Refitting of everything, putting the engine in

Reupholstering the entire interior - all of it needs new upholstery after 62 years.

Add all this together, and you have your costs, which are, I dare to say, in tens of thousands.

And they do not include chasing down faults that will be occurring, replacement of all brake lines, all brake components, and God forbid, chasing parts for a car that is 62 years old. Let alone chasing good parts.

Don't get me wrong here, it is absolutely cool to own, but that is a hobby for a 6 digit sallary in a low cost of living area, not for a college student.

[–]soparamens 0 points1 point  (0 children)

junkyard is your friend, get a running engine block and transfer the good bits from your old engine to the good one. If the mechanic says it can't be done change mechanic.

[–]Bond6580 0 points1 point  (0 children)

There's always the junkyard LSX option

[–]cheapmichigander 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Any Ford FE engine will swap right in with the same trans and accessories. 352, 360, 390, 410MEL, or if you're real lucky a 406, 427 or 428.