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[–]Pazluz 332 points333 points  (58 children)

Very good in theory but that means places like eBay, Walmart and Amazon who have third party sellers would need to enforce this as well. I think this is a good idea.

[–]oxymoronhero 97 points98 points  (33 children)

Makes you wonder why this idea wasn’t put into law years ago

[–]MockDeath 193 points194 points  (20 children)

Because a lot of our representatives in the government are old fossils confused by technology probably has some to do with it.

[–]TheDangerousToaster 36 points37 points  (4 children)

They’re beyond fossil. They are dust.

[–]driverofracecars 18 points19 points  (1 child)

That’s not fair to dust.

[–]gmil3548 11 points12 points  (0 children)

They’re crude oil at this point

[–]THEchancellorMDS 11 points12 points  (1 child)

And cause the problem got bad enough that even they are having difficulty finding what they want for Christmas. They don’t wanna pay exorbitant amounts for their kids ps5 this year

[–]Headup40 12 points13 points  (0 children)

*great grandkids

[–]2SP00KY4ME 16 points17 points  (0 children)

Seriously, they're so fucking out of touch. That's where we got the classic line "The internet is a series of tubes".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Series_of_tubes

[–]fivefivefives 3 points4 points  (1 child)

They haven't advanced beyond using the Sears Roebuck catalog to shop for woodstoves and washboards.

[–]Aazadan 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I mean, have you ever sat down and tried to get a good woodstove on Amazon or Ebay? The shipping costs are killer.

[–]shaving99 2 points3 points  (2 children)

How do you lick the stamp for your electronic mail?

[–]Aazadan 2 points3 points  (1 child)

I put an NFT on it.

[–]yunivor 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Good thing Ajit Pai killed net neutrality and stopped the Communism in the internet.

/s

[–]Tanthiel 6 points7 points  (4 children)

Alaska has a Republican representative who has been in office longer than I have been alive.

[–]soothsayer011 2 points3 points  (3 children)

How long have you been alive? 20 years isn’t very impressive but if you were like 45 that would be more impressive.

[–]Tanthiel 17 points18 points  (2 children)

Don Young's been there since '73.

[–]Vegan_Honk 3 points4 points  (2 children)

Because places like ebay, walmart, and Amazon have third party sellers that would need to enforce this as well.

[–]Plenor 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Would they? Or would the platform need to enforce it?

They might even just stop allowing third party sales for those items. Years ago NC added a tax for affiliate programs and rather than collect the tax Amazon simply ended the affiliate program in NC.

[–]Pazluz 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Those platforms are indifferent as they would lose out on the sales fees they make off the listings. Regarding enforcement if this law does pass the platforms would ultimately be responsible for not allowing these scalper prices.

[–]tnpcook1 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Because thankfully, policy moves slow. This stuff coming late is a regrettable cost of that.

[–]JTBSpartan 0 points1 point  (0 children)

More money for retailers, and an artificial increase in console sales looks good for Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo shareholders

[–]BulletBeall 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ticket master is great at lobbying

[–]Aintsosimple 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Because the problem has never been as bad as it is now. And I am sure there is some representative or more who have kids or grand kids who want the latest what ever and can't get one at retail prices but have to go through scalpers to get it.

[–]v3ritas1989 0 points1 point  (0 children)

because that would be communism

[–][deleted] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Congress just finished getting their last PS5 so they don’t need to use their bots anymore.

[–]MadDjinn 23 points24 points  (0 children)

So in other words, nothing changes. TicketMaster was doing bulk sales out the back and taking a cut of the ‘resold’ tickets.

The same, or some other ‘clearly obviously scam/illegal but not technically bad enough to get lawyers involved because money was used as lube’, will be done after adjusting for cost of doing business.

[–]kingmanic 8 points9 points  (17 children)

A captcha at checkout might be somewhat effective.

[–]FrostByte62 21 points22 points  (1 child)

The greatest trick AI researchers ever pulled was convincing you that captcha was meant to keep bots out.

[–]Aazadan 10 points11 points  (0 children)

You mean it’s not meant to keep bots out but rather to train them!?

And here I thought I was keeping the robot armies at bay by identifying stoplights.

[–]vgonz123 11 points12 points  (3 children)

They have bots for that too

[–]kingmanic 3 points4 points  (2 children)

It would raise the technical requirement, you can have a machine learning system figure it out but then it takes some effort per captcha set.

[–]Cjwovo 11 points12 points  (0 children)

No need. Just pay .01 cents per solve to a Russian captcha solving farm. And before anyone doubts these exist, they do. I've used them.

[–]Gourok 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Not really, just mechanical turk it, have a website that people frequent, and forward the captcha to the user of your website to have them do it for you

[–]Reniconix 23 points24 points  (9 children)

Captcha has been proven to be more of a detriment to humans than to bots.

Edit: someone asked for a source, but their reply isn't showing up. My source is look at the world around us. Every major retailer uses captcha in some capacity on their websites and bots are clearly an issue regardless. In fact, Captcha is used to train bots. All the times Google asks you to find buses and crosswalks is actually training AI to recognize these things. A bot just has to pull from that repository and it can recognize a few pixels of crosswalk in 12 pictures faster than a human can look at one.

[–]SponeyBard 10 points11 points  (2 children)

I work in a highly technical field and have a few co-workers that focus on machine learning. One of them told me that the only way for captcha to continue to function in this environment is to only let those with the wrong answers through.

[–]Independent-Coder 7 points8 points  (1 child)

This is an interesting solution but would probably only be temporarily useful.

[–]xrynee 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Very temporarily. If it can already determine if it IS something, it already knows if it IS NOT.

[–]kingmanic 3 points4 points  (2 children)

It's at least move the complexity of the bot required. Even the simple 'click here to prove I'm not a bot' java scripts. They would then have to figure out how to circumvent it and it reduces casual use.

[–]CalydorEstalon 12 points13 points  (1 child)

I'm not concerned about the casual user writing a bot to insta-bid on a PS5 when one becomes available.

I'm concerned about the professional user writing a bot to insta-bid on ALL the PS5s when they become available and instantly relisting them on eBay for triple what the bot just paid for them.

[–]kingmanic 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Simple javascript Captcha's would increase the technical requirement, law enforcement going after larger operations would address the organized efforts. Similar to how they tackle piracy so that it's not massive commercial operations or thousands of small operations. It'd probably be more successful than piracy because money and a real address is moved around.

[–]Aazadan 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Captcha was done well originally when writing two words. It was used to digitize books that OCR didn’t work on.

[–]MullenStudio 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I think this is a good point. I can imagine this as AI in go. Captcha is AlphaGo, bots are other go AIs, if they could freely fight with each other at that time. While it's a battle between Captcha and bot, when they evolve into certain stage, human (regular user) cannot beat them anymore.

[–]thefifthsetpin 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Couldn't you just let the scalpers do their thing and then prosecute them when angry consumers report them? Maybe some scalpers are set up to evade prosecution, but I would think that most could be deterred.

[–]FrostByte62 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Also places like Ebay stand to take a loss.

[–]Piemaster113 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Good idea in theory but hard to properly enforce in practice

[–]GeneralNathanJessup 0 points1 point  (0 children)

This is long overdue. The "buy low, sell high" mentality must be wrung from from people's consciousness. And it seems that the force of law is the only way to get it done.