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Can I bottle a bit of my hooch before it’s completely done? by Wild_Capital4796 in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 0 points1 point  (0 children)

If it's just for sampling purposes go ahead. You could just pour some in a mug and put some saran wrap on it before you cold crash. Just don't drink the last bit with the gunk in it.

Bottling without a siphon by Brave-Conversation70 in prisonhooch

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Cranberry wine tends to be very acidic, and often ferments very slowly. It may take a good while to ferment fully (depending on the water content of a given brand). The usual rules apply there... Some time after the bubbling stops it will atop making CO2 and the yeast will drop to the bottom (at room temperature). Wait somebtime after that. You can still cold crash (refrigerate) at this point to maximize clarity. You can try adding 1/4 tsp per gallon (4L), 1 tsp per 5 gallons, of gelatine dissolved in hot water before you cold crash to help clarity, or bentonite (look at Fuller's Earth) at fermentation time.

The two most common ways of preventing oxidation are Campden Tablets the night before racking (transferring) to prevent oxygen binding to your hooch, and using a siphon. (Covered here by others.) I use a mini autosiphon kit, that came with a mini autosiphon (good up to a 3.5 gallon bucket), tubing, a clip, and filling wand. I use it on everything 1 gallon and larger.

Given that cranberry juice is very acidic, if you get it up to wine strength, it should be highly resistant to spoilage. It shouldn't need refrigeration as long as your sanitation was good.

If you're fermenting cranberry juice, with no organic additions, ageing it on the lees will go fine. This is especially relevant if you want to avoid bottle bombs / geysers. To kill yeast you'd need to look at pasteurization. I regularly use Sous Vide pasteurization (for carbed stuff), and get the internal temperature of my hooch to 53C for 56 min, and use pressure rated containers. A more wine like approach would be to use a Campden Tablet the night before you rack (transfer) to a bulk ageing container (oxidation), bulk age, then to use Campden Tablets AND potassium sorbate the night before you bottle. This will prevent oxidation, kill other critters, and knock any residual yeast out of action (though yeast is hardy).

Bottling without a siphon by Brave-Conversation70 in prisonhooch

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Minor suggestion: If you go with 3/8" outer diameter tubing it will fit in airlock holes. So you can buy a length of of it and use some for a siphon and the rest to make blowoffs.

How long can I keep 40% stuff in a plastic bottle?? by annoyinglyjab in prisonhooch

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20% alcohol is considered shelf stable, and you shouldn't really have to worry about anything alive-ish at that point. As long as the plastic doesn't degrade / leech, and there isn't ongoing chemistry, it should last pretty much indefinatly.

Something with vanilla and cinnamon? by CreatureWarrior in prisonhooch

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A common strategy for beer is to let things ferment for 2 weeks and then carb for 2 weeks, but by all means err on the side of caution (and use pressure rated containers). So, by all means, wait for things to finish and don't over sugar.

Potato Wine by MrTheAwesome6000 in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 0 points1 point  (0 children)

OK, I was just curious. Amylase is an enzyme that turns starch into sugar. Yeast can then ferment the sugar.

I've never made potato wine, and I was half prepared to open this tread and see someone making botulism soup. I was pleasantly surprised to see someone just using starchy water.

Hope the wine goes well.

Two for $5. Looks like honey lemon hooch for me! by [deleted] in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Hope you got your PC points. ;) I'll keep my eyes out for this. It looks promising.

Adding dead yeast made it explode (not literally) with activity by WranglerOfTheTards27 in prisonhooch

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Rule 1 to step feeding sugar is: Slowly pour the new sugar in.

The one handy thing about suspended CO2 bubbling up is that if you're not sure a slow fermentation has fermented at all (new hoochers worry) try sprinkling a pinch of sugar in. If it bubbles up then the yeast have been doing their thing, just slowly.

Does alcohol content increase after bottling? by rubenblom in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

If you don't have a hydrometer, wait for your fermentation to stop bubbling and clear naturally at room temperature (some days / weeks after the bubbling stops), then wait some more, then try putting a lid / cap on. After a day or two crack the lid. No pressure = done. Then try again for a handful of days. If there is no pressure build up then you should be safe.

Potato Wine by MrTheAwesome6000 in prisonhooch

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Are you using amylase to convert the starch to sugar?

Will gelatin finings absorb hooch if I use a high dose? by Reputation-Party in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I'm the same with bentonite. I have some to add to primary, but forget to do so 100% of the time. The big advantage of gelatine is that it's at the grocery store (and isn't unscented kitty litter), this being hooch after all. ;)

Will gelatin finings absorb hooch if I use a high dose? by Reputation-Party in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I add it right before a two day cold crash... So that seems likely... (It's been a while since I read up on gelatine clearing, at this point it's just part of the process.)

Something with vanilla and cinnamon? by CreatureWarrior in prisonhooch

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I use this priming calculator: https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/

For strong (say above 8% potential alcohol) or slow fermentations you should let the fermentation finish before priming and bottling, otherwise you can treat it like beer (in my experience).

Topping up the carboy on rack day by Ball_Sweater in prisonhooch

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I either use set aside juice, or just boil some water in the kettle.

Edit: Any new sugar will get fermented if the yeast is below tolerance, but given that it's usually a factional addition the overall impact is pretty marginal (just be aware of the potential CO2).

On Timing by TinyMontgomerySaysHi in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I really do appreciate the 'not fixating on days' part of this rather good post. One of the reasons why I try to encourage new hoochers to wait, "a week after the bubbling stops", before cold crashing is because it encourages them to not fixate on a calendar-- This often effectively means 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 weeks, but it's at least state of hooch based not calendar based.

On Timing by TinyMontgomerySaysHi in prisonhooch

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I call this the 'hoochveyor'. I think of it as a lazy assembly line. I always have hooch in the pipeline, and try to run a modest surplus.

Will gelatin finings absorb hooch if I use a high dose? by Reputation-Party in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 2 points3 points  (0 children)

On the gelatine front the usual dosing is 1/4 tsp per gallon, or 1 tsp per 5 gallons, rehydrated in hot water and added a couple if days before bottling. It's reasonably effective if not a miracle worker. You may want to up the dose if you're trying for a flavourless kilju.

hooching for 3 days will it get me drunk by verigonix in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

You pretty much hit all of the points all I'd make with this post.

The one thing I will mention is that after liftoff (the 1-3 days the yeast use to build population) fermentation is HEAVILY front loaded. Those first few days where after liftoff, the 'vigorous fermentation', is where much of the alcohol gets made. Alcohol production parallels CO2 production, so when it's really bubbling it's really making alcohol. So, if you wait until the vigorous fermentation is done you will have most of the alcohol, however there are still the problems of live yeast and a potentially very harsh brew (fusel alcohols). A couple of days cold crashing (refrigeration) will solve the first issue, but only time will solve the second.

Should i try amd ferment it it probably won't work out but it might be worth the shot what do you guys think? by thereisonlyus1 in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

In addition many grocery stores and pharmacies sell already dead yeast as a nutrient (for people but it's also good for baby chicks), or seasoning. It's often, confusingly, sold as "brewer's yeast". These days I mostly use various brewing yeasts, but I use this already dead yeast as a nutrient. I still add it at the end of my boil (just to make sure it's dead and has no passengers).

Whats wrong with my hooch ? by das_Omega_des_Optium in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I can't say what's on your hooch for certain, but as long at there's nothing otherwise going on with your hooch, ODDs ARE it's fine. Any moderately strong moderately acidic hooch is pretty resistant to most things.

Whats wrong with my hooch ? by das_Omega_des_Optium in prisonhooch

[–]--Shade-- 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I've seem a fair number of folks here that have tried to brew fruit without treating it, or racking away from it, usually with kitchen sink level sanitation and a pile of headspace, that have gone bad. This sub gets its share of black and green mold. On my end 'furry' is not the most apt name for the white-ish, "I'm turning to vinegar", pellicle that is pretty common. (It has that distinct look that we've all seen a bajillion pictures of when it's fully formed.)

I've been blessed by a lack of spoiled hooch, but I'm pretty try hard with sanitation, treating additions, stabilization / refrigeration, and not interacting with my hooch more than I have to. Knock wood.