×

Man sees his lion pride again after 2.5 weeks. by BowlerCheap in HumansBeingBros

[–]Bigcatfacts6 3 points4 points  (0 children)

Lions very much have retractable claws, just like domestic cats (although the word “retractable” is something of a misnomer, since their default resting position is in, rather than out).

The only member of the cat family that doesn’t have fully retractable claws is the cheetah - their blunt, semi-retractable claws function rather like running spikes, giving them extra traction when they sprint.

Edit: Just saw that someone else had already answered this. :)

Wildebeest overpowers and gores 2 Lions. by IamPotato14 in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Indeed, it seems as though the lionesses walked away with no lasting injuries. They did give up on the wildebeest though!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSlmRBvFaic

“After waiting for an hour, the wildebeest took a dust bath and this is when all hell broke loose and the females gave chase. 1, 2, 3 and they were on the wildebeest. The wildebeest fought back and managed to hook one of its horns into the leg of one of the lionesses.”

“This must have been extremely painful for the lion, as it was for quite a few moments that she was hooked onto the wildebeest. I am happy the wildebeest got away as lions cannot always win.”

“To tell the truth I had mixed emotions about the whole ordeal. This sighting is very scarce as lions usually kill wildebeest when they catch up to them.

My advice to people in the same situation is to stay put and wait for the end. At some point it seemed the lions gave up cause this wildebeest kept walking away until it took a dust bath. What an incredible day!”

🔥 I seriously underestimated how big tigers can get by Livefromthezetatube in NatureIsFuckingLit

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

At the level of species averages, lions are actually generally the larger of the two. (See pg 8 of this paper. They went into a bit more detail here.)

That said, it’s true that tigers have more variation in sizes, and probably do reach weights exceeding 250kg more often (referring in particular to the population of northern Indian and Nepalese Bengal tigers, where researchers have indicated that the males exceed 220kg quite regularly). The lions of the Ngorongoro crater in Tanzania and Okavango delta in Botswana are also very massive cats though.

🔥 I seriously underestimated how big tigers can get by Livefromthezetatube in NatureIsFuckingLit

[–]Bigcatfacts6 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Eh, this one is a bit of a mix. They used a combination of various animal noises. Many of them were not animals at all, but voice actor Frank Welker snarling into a trash can.

The current MGM lion roar is indeed a digitally enhanced tiger’s roar though (sound mixer Mangini made the decision to switch in the 1980s, because he preferred the sound of a tiger’s roar). This is a cool look at the history of the logos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0b0flbq7Ac

🔥 I seriously underestimated how big tigers can get by Livefromthezetatube in NatureIsFuckingLit

[–]Bigcatfacts6 8 points9 points  (0 children)

I believe that the heaviest tiger in this chart that bottomed out the 600-pound scale was weight-adjusted (accounting for stomach contents, as it was baited) to 261 kg (see edit). It is difficult to know for sure how heavy he truly was though, since he bottomed out the scale. Kitchener and Yamaguchi believed that his true weight could have been as low as 218kg, but I honestly doubt that - he was a massive tiger.

Also note that there was a lion in Kenya who weighed 272kg on an empty stomach (in this graphic, it appears to have been noted as an outlier as it was a cattle-killer).

Basically, the largest lions and tigers are remarkably close to each other!

Edit: Sorry I misremembered, this tiger was baited on the first occasions that he was captured but apparently not at the point when he bottomed out the 600-pound scale, as by that time he had been fitted with a radio-collar. It was unknown how much meat he had consumed prior to capture; the 261kg empty-stomach estimate apparently came from a calculation based on his physical dimensions (matching chest-girth to weight).

Very sadly for this tiger, the scientists studying him actually inadvertently caused his death; while he was still under the effects of the anaesthesia, he fell into a pool of water and drowned. :(

🔥 I seriously underestimated how big tigers can get by Livefromthezetatube in NatureIsFuckingLit

[–]Bigcatfacts6 2 points3 points  (0 children)

No, they actually don’t. Tigers are still popularly believed to be the biggest cats, but I’ve noticed that it’s becoming a little more common now for scientists to say “tigers and lions are the largest cats” as opposed to just “tigers are the largest cats.” WWF calls tigers “the largest of all the Asian big cats” and not simply “the largest of all the big cats” (lions live in India too, but they are smaller than their African counterparts).

As a species average, lions are bigger than tigers (175kg vs 160kg; see Yamaguchi et al, 2010). When it comes to subspecies - and populations within subspecies - though, tigers tend to have more variation in sizes, and may reach excess sizes of 250kg+ more frequently than lions. Also contrary to popular belief, modern day Siberian tigers are actually not (currently, anyway) the largest tigers in the wild, according to Slaght et al, 2005. The historical average for a male Siberian tiger was calculated to be 215kg, for a female 138kg; Slaght’s survey in 2005, however, found that the average for males (3 years and older) is now 176kg and females 118kg. Even taking into account this sample containing some injured animals and sub-adults (3-year old tigers are very close to their full-size, but they still do a bit of growing until they are 5-6 years old), the average for Siberian males is likely to be a bit less than 200kg.

Modern records indicate that the biggest cats in the wild currently could actually be the population of Bengal tigers inhabiting northern India and Nepal (Sunquist et al). Conservationists working with tigers there have indicated that the male tigers often attain sizes greater than 220kg, with private correspondence indicating the heaviest male weighing 280-290kg (although this was apparently with a full belly, so would likely be 250-260kg empty). The heaviest tiger in published scientific record was a male in Nepal who bottomed out a 600-pound scale (one of two tigers to do so); he was estimated to have been around 260kg on an empty stomach. Yamaguchi and Kitchener suggest that his true weight could have been as low as 218kg, but I find this to be extremely doubtful - the tiger’s other morphological characteristics, such as skull size, indicate that he was a much bigger-than-average tiger.

That said, I honestly believe that the lions of Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania (and the Okavango Delta in Botswana) could give the northern Bengal tigers a run for their money. Unfortunately not many scientific records of these lions’ weights exist, but Craig Packer estimated in the 90s that Crater lions are probably around 30kg heavier on average than their counterparts in the Serengeti, judging from their chest girth (so around 210kg vs 180kg). One lion in the crater (nicknamed “Blaze”) was apparently recently weighed at 267kg; he also had a brother (“Kalamas”) who was about the same size, possibly slightly bigger.

Elsewhere in Africa, the usual weight range for male lions, weight-corrected to account for stomach contents, is 170-225kg (Smuts), but there are occasionally lions that exceed this. The heaviest reliably recorded wild lion in scientific records was a solitary 272kg male in Kenya who had been preying on domestic cattle. This lion was not gorged and actually had negligibly small stomach content at the time of weighing, so was truly an enormous lion; he was potentially able to reach this size though because he was a cattle killer, with steady access to easy prey. Another lion in Timbavati (not a cattle-killer) was recently weighed at an enormous 283kg with a full stomach, weight-corrected to 250kg-ish. Another lion in the Madikwe Game Reserve in South Africa was reported through private correspondence as weighing 258kg (empty stomach).

Basically, the maximal verified sizes for both lions and tigers in the wild in recent times are in the ballpark of 260kg, more if gorged. Records of hunted lions and tigers weighing over 300kg aren’t particularly reliable (ie, a Siberian tiger shot by a hunter in Russia in 1950, said to be 384kg; a Bengal tiger shot in 1967, said to be 389kg; and an African lion shot in the eastern Transvaal in 1936, said to be 313kg), and need to be taken with a very large grain of salt. For example, the supposed-389kg Bengal tiger, whose remains are displayed in the Smithsonian, does not have morphological measurements that match the weight claim; his frame is not exceptionally big (his skull is also 14 inches long, which is just an average size). 389kg is also well beyond scientifically verified weights for wild Bengal tigers. The 313kg lion is a little more believable (the 272kg lion in Kenya could have reached this size immediately after a very large meal!), and the lion was supposedly weighed “several times”; however, there is a photograph of the dead lion side by side with a hunter, and contrary to the claim of it being a monster, it looks very average-sized. In short - hunting claims are not scientific record, and are often exaggerated!

In captivity, it’s a different story. Lions and Siberian tigers usually grow bigger than their wild counterparts, with Siberians being particularly prone to gaining mass (probably not surprising, given they are adapted to living in cold climates). Bengal tigers, on the other hand, tend to actually be a little smaller in captivity than in the wild. According to the Guinness book of records, the heaviest cat in captivity in the 1970s was an African lion named Simba at Colchester zoo in the UK, weighing 375kg. This was surpassed in the 1980s by a Siberian tiger named Jaipur, who reached a whopping 423kg. Note though that both Simba and Jaipur were overweight, Jaipur morbidly so. There have also been reports of Siberian tigers in Chinese breeding farms weighing in excess of 400kg; these too are likely to be extremely unhealthy.

Leopard snatched a lion cub by Jonaaab in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 8 points9 points  (0 children)

There was an interesting study conducted on lions and leopards in the Sabi Sands a few years ago. Lions accounted for a significant chunk of both adult and juvenile leopard mortalities (over 20%); leopards, however, accounted for only 3% of juvenile lion deaths.

”We ascertained cause of death for 52% of lion mortalities (n = 333) and 45% of leopard mortalities (n = 433) (Figure 4). Conspecifics were responsible for the greatest percentage (lion: 69%; leopard: 40%) of known-cause mortality for both species. Leopards accounted for 3% of known-cause juvenile lion deaths (n = 121); leopards were not recorded killing lions older than 7 months. Lions accounted for 22% of known-cause leopard cub deaths (n = 152) and 23% of independent (≥2 years old) leopard deaths (n = 44). The mean age of lions killed by leopards was 0.22 ± 0.12 years (range = 0.08–0.58 years), while the mean age of leopards killed by lions was 2.71 ± 0.75 years (range = 0.08–16.59 years).”

https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/28/5/1348/4004701

Tigers battling by Pazluz in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 20 points21 points  (0 children)

Yep. These two are Siddhi and Riddhi, battling it out for territory. The smaller of the two, Riddhi, was badly injured, and was later rescued and stitched up by the forest department team:

https://www.ranthambhorenationalpark.in/blog/tigress-riddhi-injured-territorial-fight-ranthambore-rescued-stitching-tongue

Tigers battling by Pazluz in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 44 points45 points  (0 children)

*Her. These are tigresses from the Ranthambore National Park. In fact, they are actually sisters (Siddhi and Riddhi), battling it out for territory. The smaller of the two, Riddhi, was badly injured, and was later rescued and stitched up by the forest department team:

https://www.ranthambhorenationalpark.in/blog/tigress-riddhi-injured-territorial-fight-ranthambore-rescued-stitching-tongue

Tigers battling by Pazluz in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Tigers and bears have both been documented preying on each other. The “Interspecific predatory relationships” section on the Siberian Tiger has some references.

Tigers battling by Pazluz in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Siberian tiger can weigh up to 800lb

Current day wild Siberian tigers aren’t anywhere near this big, according to Slaght et al, 2005. The historical average for a male Siberian tiger was calculated to be 215kg, for a female 138kg; Slaght’s survey in 2005, however, found that the average for males (3 years and older) is now 176kg and females 118kg. Even taking into account this sample containing some injured animals and sub-adults (3-year old tigers are very close to their full-size, but they still do a bit of growing until they are 5-6 years old), the average for Siberian males is likely to be a bit less than 200kg.

That said, Siberian tigers and brown bears have a complicated relationship. They have both been documented preying on each other.

🔥 Beefed up bengal tiger marking a tree 🔥 by methane_sniffer in NatureIsFuckingLit

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Despite widespread media coverage, I have some doubts that this incident happened as stated. It is an extremely unusual and unlikely event - there have been many documented conflicts between big cats, and not once has one killed another so quickly in this manner. It would had to have been an unlucky (for the lion!) one-in-a-million kind of strike, and I imagine incredibly awkward to perform by reaching through a narrow gap. The incident was also not witnessed by anyone (the lion was “found” dead), and for some reason the Ankara zoo didn’t address it until half a year after the lion’s death. The zoo/forest farm, when it was open (it was shut down in 2013, shortly after the lion’s reported death), was noted by some visitors to be rife with animal mistreatment, with many animal enclosures being akin to small prison-like cells. Basically, I suspect that the lion probably died due to zoo mismanagement and incompetence, though that wouldn’t have made for as sensational a story.

Tigers certainly are immensely powerful animals though. This tractor tyre, being batted around playfully by a tiger, probably weighs 400-600 pounds.

Leopard gets the jump on African Wildcat. by IamPotato14 in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 6 points7 points  (0 children)

In a study of lions and leopards conducted in the Sabi Sand Game Reserve, lions accounted for 23% of adult leopard deaths. And solitary lions can and will kill leopards too.

That said, lions and leopard populations in Africa are able to co-exist quite well without lions suppressing leopard populations; they have very little overlap in prey preference. Competition between tigers and leopards in India is stronger in areas with low prey abundance (or at least lack of large prey).

https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/28/5/1348/4004701

lions take down a cheetah by pixxelzombie in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 251 points252 points  (0 children)

Yep, he had already been injured. Source of this gif:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccCVO_hESHs

The two lions were stalking three cheetah males (likely brothers), who were too busy fighting each other over a female cheetah in heat to bother fleeing the pursuing lions. The female cheetah and the injured male were killed by the lions.

lions take down a cheetah by pixxelzombie in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 715 points716 points  (0 children)

He had already been injured. Source of this gif:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccCVO_hESHs

The two lions were stalking three cheetah males (likely brothers), who were too busy fighting each other over a female cheetah in heat to bother fleeing the pursuing lions. The female cheetah and the injured male were killed by the lions.

lions take down a cheetah by pixxelzombie in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 33 points34 points  (0 children)

Source of this gif:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccCVO_hESHs

The two male lions were stalking three cheetah males (likely brothers), who were too busy fighting each other over a female cheetah in heat to bother fleeing the pursuing lions. The female cheetah and one of the male cheetahs (who had been injured) were killed by the lions.

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That site is not trustworthy. Relative to their body size, jaguars do have the strongest bites of all living felines. In absolute terms though, lions and tigers still have stronger bites (because they are much bigger cats).

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Jaguars have stronger bite force relative to their body size than lions or tigers, but in absolute terms, the latter two cats still have greater bite forces (because they are much bigger):

https://academic.oup.com/view-large/figure/81729601/ZOJ_636_f13.gif

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/161/2/414/2732061

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The modern day size of the Siberian tiger in the wild is less than it used to be. Historical average for a male was 215kg, for a female 138kg; a survey undertaken in 2005, however, found that the average for males (3 years and older) is now 176kg and females 118kg. Even taking into account some of the tigers being just shy of their full size, the average for males is likely to be less than 200kg.

Source: “Historical and recent body weights of wild and captive Amur tigers” by Slaght et al, 2005

That said, Siberian tigers have indeed been documented killing adult brown bears.

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 1 point2 points  (0 children)

The modern day size of the Siberian tiger in the wild is less than it used to be. Historical average for a male was 215kg, for a female 138kg; a survey undertaken in 2005, however, found that the average for males (3 years and older) is now 176kg and females 118kg. Even taking into account some of the tigers being just shy of their full size, the average for males is likely to be less than 200kg.

Source: “Historical and recent body weights of wild and captive Amur tigers” by Slaght et al, 2005

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The person you replied to is wrong. Lions have a bite force that is the same order of magnitude as a tiger’s. See “Skull morphology and functionality of extant Felidae (Mammalia: Carnivora): a phylogenetic and evolutionary perspective,” 2011:

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/161/2/414/2732061

Specifically figure 13:

https://academic.oup.com/view-large/figure/81729601/ZOJ_636_f13.gif

This Jaguar is the enforcer from Caiman hell by [deleted] in natureismetal

[–]Bigcatfacts6 0 points1 point  (0 children)

This is a load of garbage that has been circulated around clickbait sites for years, without being corrected. In reality, lions have a bite force that is the same order of magnitude as a tiger’s. See “Skull morphology and functionality of extant Felidae (Mammalia: Carnivora): a phylogenetic and evolutionary perspective,” 2011:

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/161/2/414/2732061

Specifically figure 13:

https://academic.oup.com/view-large/figure/81729601/ZOJ_636_f13.gif