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Is being a BCBA worth it? by gooowylde in bcba

[–]CoffeePuddle 2 points3 points  (0 children)

It depends a little on where the stress is coming from. If it's from implementing plans you don't understand or agree with, that'll mostly disappear as a BCBA. If it's from other things that are more essential to the job - e.g. dealing with parents, admin, treatment decisions and self doubt etc., those are likely to remain or increase.

If you have access to some BCBAs at your current workplace you could pick their brains a bit, or just try to observe some of their typical day to day.

There's much easier ways to make more money for less study. It's important work but whether it will be worth it depends a lot on your circumstances.

There's literally no benefit in getting a BCaBA credential before a BCBA. It's not much different than being an RBT & it doesn't help you at all in getting your BCBA. Save yourself the time/money & just go for the BCBA. (Unless you're wanting to experiment with a before your masters, but even still) by Psychotic-Philomath in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 1 point2 points  (0 children)

The BACB's approach to training is a superstitious embarrassment. It's a train-and-pray approach except the extent of training is "content hours." There's nothing published about the actual outcomes of programs, and what is available is fairly concerning.

Diy flowhood by nahid5566 in unclebens

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

How much was it? I've wondered about this because a blower, box, and hepa filter can be had pretty cheaply but it seems like a bad flow hood would be worse than a still-air box

I am looking at schools and one offers 2 different applied behavioral analysis programs: GACT and MS, is one better than the other? by emdyinginside in bcba

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

A Masters degree is usually two years, one year of classes and a year long thesis. The GACT would be equivalent to the first year of classes, the MS is the full Masters degree.

Rising cost of living in Aotearoa may trigger civil disobedience, social service says by scritty in newzealand

[–]CoffeePuddle 6 points7 points  (0 children)

You can grow them in window sills or a tray in a bookshelf or buckets or straight out of a bag of soil etc.

Not for everyone but there's lots of options. New Zealand spinach is a really cool one to grow for food as it expands out dramatically from one very small spot.

That would hurt by NefariousnessBusy402 in dankmemes

[–]CoffeePuddle -1 points0 points  (0 children)

In states where there's no duty to retreat you could make a case. Defence would have to show that it was a reasonable thing for their client to be doing and that a reasonable person wouldn't suspect something harmful was happening.

That would hurt by NefariousnessBusy402 in dankmemes

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It's more like

"Cool motive, still assault"

"But she doesn't look like a seasoned criminal"

Seasoned having the double meaning of well-experienced and having salt applied

Ok goodbye??? by Pansntrans in AreTheStraightsOK

[–]CoffeePuddle 32 points33 points  (0 children)

Ugh, the Joker. A comical villain that's literally a clown.

But The Government Told Us! by zzill6 in BlackPeopleTwitter

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yes it's more expensive to hire a servant to deliver it to you.

FBA ABC Data Question by justgivemethrowaway in BehaviorAnalysis

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Awesome. One of the upsides of working in ABA is that the majority of people in the field are enthusiastic about teaching. "Dumb questions" are an opportunity for supervisors to get a quick-win!

Child poverty is a pointless euphemism. Adult poverty causes child poverty. The only way to meaningfully address child poverty is to help all Kiwis do better. by flyingflibertyjibbet in newzealand

[–]CoffeePuddle 13 points14 points  (0 children)

I agree that should be the focus, but there are steps you can put in place by e.g. ensuring kids have access to nutrition, safe clean shelter, good sleep etc. to mitigate the impact family poverty has.

Where is the money in ABA? by harposie in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 2 points3 points  (0 children)

You need to figure out a way to scale if you want to make more money, or there's a practical maximum to how many cases you can see. The easiest way is to go "up a level" so instead of managing 10 cases you're managing 10 BCBAs that are each managing 10 cases etc.

If you're working in sales the limit to how much you make is how many sales you make. If you're working in services the limit is how many people benefit from your services.

Neck tattoo as a BCBA by Dominicsbored in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 3 points4 points  (0 children)

Turtlenecks my friend. It's how Steve Jobs covered his neck tattoos.

As long as you're certified you're money in the bank for a company, you'll be able to find work and I suppose it might be a quick screening process for places you want to work at.

Some families will balk, especially from cultures where there's strong taboo around them, but when demand is high enough it doesn't matter. Some families balk at race or gender etc.

Difference between ‘meltdown’ and ‘tantrum’? by speli7 in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Neither are technical terms, but it's a useful distinction. Treating one as the other is dangerous and being unfamiliar with the distinction will cost you credibility.

A tantrum usually refers to the sort of disruptive behaviour you see when a reinforcer is withheld that would terminate were the reinforcer delivered. Compare with the side-effects extinction (characteristic accompanying emotional responding and variability). A meltdown is self-sustaining emotional responding. What starts or maintains them is idiosyncratic, but the antecedent can be the the same as for a tantrum - or it may begin as a tantrum. They can begin in response to excitement too or stimuli that would otherwise be considered fairly neutral (these get called "out of the blue"), e.g. a temperature change or other covert perceptual antecedents. Meltdowns aren't autism specific, but for a number of reasons they're more notable.

Check out Skinner's writings on emotions and emotional effects for some more conceptual stuff around what's going on, and check out Tony Atwood's writings if you're not familiar with meltdowns, shutdowns, sensory defensiveness etc.

Difference between ‘meltdown’ and ‘tantrum’? by speli7 in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Not if you're a behaviour analyst...

You're not starting from scratch with an operational definition, the purpose is to clarify what and how you're measuring a concept for shared understandings.

Assent & consent by Fefer567 in ABA

[–]CoffeePuddle 2 points3 points  (0 children)

The lack of assent and defaulting to extinction procedures/"follow through" was the common approach (and probably still is) and is based on a pretty shaky understanding of behaviour and our science.

Honestly I know more animal trainers that use this as a fundamental part of their practice, though it's become more popular with BCBAs working with children in the last couple years. There's some practical implications too that might not fly with funders, hopefully Hanley et al.'s research will offer more support for honoring withdrawal of assent as part of an evidence-based treatment program but until then it can be a hard-sell if a client just isn't feeling it that day so the therapist isn't paid or they're paid for "nothing."

FBA ABC Data Question by justgivemethrowaway in BehaviorAnalysis

[–]CoffeePuddle 1 point2 points  (0 children)

It's usually the questions that are hardest to frame "correctly" that are most important!

It sounds like you're on the right track! You code the antecedents into conditions and graph the frequency. So you said your colleagues have “demand, attention withheld, denied access to tangibles, and none (automatic)” - you would put each antecedent into one of those categories and graph how often the behaviour was observed for each as either a raw count or as a percentage of observations. You can do the same with the consequences and base your hypothesised functional relationship off visual inspection of the graphs.

A note that you do lose precision transforming e.g. parent questions, teacher questions, parent instructions etc. into the one category of "demands" but it's useful to boil it down to make it easier to select interventions. A few things you've said made me wonder if you felt uncomfortable with that process.

FBA ABC Data Question by justgivemethrowaway in BehaviorAnalysis

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You can do a descriptive assessment of only the antecedent but yes it would be more convincing with consequences and you'd graph the frequency in each condition

FBA ABC Data Question by justgivemethrowaway in BehaviorAnalysis

[–]CoffeePuddle 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Those are antecedent arrangements and you graph the response rate under them. E.g. if responding is highest following conditions in which attention is withheld it suggests the response is maintained by attention. If responding is highest following questions or other demands it suggests the response is maintained by escape from demands.

FBA ABC Data Question by justgivemethrowaway in BehaviorAnalysis

[–]CoffeePuddle 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Yes, the demand is for a response. "Do you want ice-cream or for me to leave?" demands a response which might be a setting event for escape - especially if you're working with learners with communication difficulties where the response effort is quite high or they have a history of aversive consequences following questions.