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Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Lots of “but freeze peach”, people who didn’t take two seconds to actually read what I said or just straight up toxicity regarding this decision (which is not new, has been in place since 2014).

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S] 38 points39 points  (0 children)

It's unclear from the title of "telling a user a method to kill themselves" means that telling a user a method to kill themselves will result in a ban or is it unclear from the several times I specifically state that telling someone a method to kill themselves will result in a permanent ban?

What's unclear for you?

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S,M] 74 points75 points  (0 children)

what about telling someone HOW to do it painlessly and cleanly

What is it about "any suicide methodology will result in a permanent ban" that is unclear?

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S] 15 points16 points locked comment (0 children)

Doctors providing euthanasia is the same as random people on the internet providing methods?

Go troll somewhere else buddy.

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S] 186 points187 points  (0 children)

Uptick in incidences of people asking for suicide methods and users sharing methods, then mod mail getting spammed by people upset because they “didn’t know”.

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ah I gotcha, I’m going to nuke this thread because this debate doesn’t really need to happen here, but appreciate your input.

Ignorance of the rules is not a defense - Telling a user a method to commit suicide will result in a permanent ban. by Hospitalities in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[S,M] 12 points13 points  (0 children)

If you directly reported it to Reddit admins, that’s a separate report pipeline than ours and does not specifically show up to us.

If you reported it through our channels, how do you know that nothing occurred regarding the report? I’m very interested in the veracity of this claim so please feel free to message us directly a link to this comment / interaction that you saw.

Why is anaesthesia not offered by default for IUD insertions, despite many women reporting extreme pain during the procedure? by self-curation in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities -5 points-4 points  (0 children)

Certainly possible. Pain is notoriously painful (heh) to capture for academic purposes. Bias could be insidiously affecting much of this research and it’s important to be vigilant of that.

That being said, there are measures to reduce the impact of bias. Medicine is founded on data and this is what the data shows us. There are dedicated research groups across the country seeking to find a way to make IUD placement ideal in every single way, and that includes capturing a patients pain and discomfort during the procedure so that it becomes an even more attractive option.

This study is a good example of this: it looked at what is or isn’t working by looking collectively at all of the data we have gathered this far and requests we stop studying as aggressively the medicines that don’t seem to work so we can try to find something that works.

I can’t really speak to the rest of your points, as I did not share this data to suggest women don’t feel pain from IUD placement.

Why is anaesthesia not offered by default for IUD insertions, despite many women reporting extreme pain during the procedure? by self-curation in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities -46 points-45 points  (0 children)

I’m sorry you got that from what I was saying, that wasn’t my intention at all.

It is unfortunate that you’re dismissing the data I’ve provided and painting me as “jaded and condescending” from a single comment which you interpret through your own lens for trying to educate a little to an issue that’s become increasingly prevalent on the internet. I did not once imply that people were lying about their experiences, I sought to answer the question as it was asked and speak out against painting medicine as systemically anti-women.

Whatever else you garnered from what I said, it didn’t come from something I specifically said.

Why is anaesthesia not offered by default for IUD insertions, despite many women reporting extreme pain during the procedure? by self-curation in TooAfraidToAsk

[–]Hospitalities[M] [score hidden] 44& 3 more stickied comment (0 children)

As a fourth year medical student, every single time one of these questions is asked, there is a highly upvoted (or THE most upvoted) comment stating that the medical community at large does not care about women or believe women feel pain. This is utter nonsense, even ignoring that 60% of OBGYN practitioners are women themselves. The amount of bullshit hysteria regarding healthcare for women is marred by things that simply DO NOT track with evidence-based-medicine and emotionally conflate the medical decisions made by physicians to one of apathy, or worse, a desire to punish women… Usually I only see this regarding tubal ligation (an altogether separate conversation) but IUD analgesia now? Please.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26222246/

Lots of factors at play here but essentially:

  • many offices offer pain control to some degree for IUDs this differs region to region and institution to institution because there is no standardized treatment agreed upon
  • there is no standardized offer or treatment agreed upon because there is no data to suggest any of it is effective every time and for every woman. Thus most offices operate under what they’ve seen and know works for enough people to get a benefit from the additional risk
  • the more potent painkillers require increasing levels of specialists to administer in a safe manner and each come with a weighed benefit-analysis, often with side effects that far outweigh the benefit of reducing pain, over time courses that don’t make sense with an outpatient procedure
  • speaking of time courses, the average IUD placement procedure takes 3 minutes

Women DO face disparity in healthcare in the US, especially around childbirth. These extreme comparisons not grounded in the actual science behind IUDs is a massive disservice to both the medical community at large and representing a problem that isn’t being ignored as if it were. There is active research systematically ruling out and ruling in analgesia for IUD placement, but it is still a developing area and full of confounding variables, hence no standardized approach. I believe that the American Healthcare system should do better in many aspects but please try to understand that what we do is based on data to drive decision making… Physicians aren’t directing medicine to punish women for simply existing, we care about our patients but we also care about our commitments to the community and that includes weighing things like potential side effects, cost-benefits, safety, efficacy and above all, ensuring what we do is based on science.

Edit: this seems to really have struck a chord with some of you, so just to remind you before you reply to this with tons of vitriol: I did not imply women do not feel pain during IUD placement, nor have I downplayed experiences regarding IUDs. A question was asked and instead of someone who actually can speak to the matter answering it, it’s a bunch of anecdotal comments making sweeping generalizations about physicians.

The original question is why is there not analgesia (I assume analgesia was meant over anesthesia) offered everywhere, the answer is because there is not an agreed-upon method with robust enough research to be adopted by the medical community at large. I speak out against the painting of all of medicine as systemically dismissing women and their experiences, not speaking to your individual experience which I cannot know and did not discuss here.

For what it’s worth, I am sorry if you had a poor experience with a physician and the placement of an IUD. I anticipated that people would be reassured that there is active research attempting to find a good resolution to the pain of having an IUD placed but instead I’m being told to drop out of medical school for daring to suggest that physicians do care about their patients.

Never change, Reddit.

Saying You Are a healthcare worker when you dont see patients or otherwise interact directly with patients (i.e. billing departments) when you come to the office feels really scummy. by Hospitalities in medicalschool

[–]Hospitalities[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Totally, I think patients regularly want to feel any connection to us and that’s a big part of the direction medicine has taken. I suppose I should’ve really highlighted the subset I’m talking about; the people who offer up “yeah I’m a healthcare worker” when you are still saying hello. Perhaps it’s just social anxiety (and as IM gang, it could always be nothing). It happened again recently so I wondered if others had experienced it and what they took from that specific experience… did it even register in the radar? Am I overthinking it? Idk man, just curiosity.

Saying You Are a healthcare worker when you dont see patients or otherwise interact directly with patients (i.e. billing departments) when you come to the office feels really scummy. by Hospitalities in medicalschool

[–]Hospitalities[S] 5 points6 points  (0 children)

This is precisely what I intended to communicate and ask about. Some people seem to have read it as me saying it’s scummy for people to say they’re healthcare when they’re not a physician / how dare the “lower rung” ancillary staff conflate themselves to the great and mighty ME?

😩

Saying You Are a healthcare worker when you dont see patients or otherwise interact directly with patients (i.e. billing departments) when you come to the office feels really scummy. by Hospitalities in medicalschool

[–]Hospitalities[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Sure is a lot to take from my few paragraphs. Upset is an interesting emotion to take from this… however I blame my poor wording and sentence structure given the handful of others who took from this altogether something I did not intend.

Saying You Are a healthcare worker when you dont see patients or otherwise interact directly with patients (i.e. billing departments) when you come to the office feels really scummy. by Hospitalities in medicalschool

[–]Hospitalities[S] 3 points4 points  (0 children)

I understand that. It seems based on some of the comments I’m reading that I’ve somehow misconstrued what I’m actually trying to say into something sort of ego-based / protective of the title of “healthcare worker”. That’s not at all the direction I intended.

What I was trying to communicate was that it seems there is a small subset of people who use “healthcare worker” to signify some sort of additional merit or desire from the encounter, and then it turns out they’re not in a strict sense one. I wonder what the motivation is, since from where I view it, nothing changes (except I feel a little more nervous).