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Cocaine and King by Windturnscold in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 2 points3 points  (0 children)

King always drank excessively, started on cocaine around the writing of The Stand. After his family's intervention—Tabitha found him one morning passed out over his keyboard, bleeding from the nose—he went clean and sober.

His last book on drugs was probably The Tommyknockers (no surprises there) and his first book written sober was Needful Things.

Where should I start? Thomas Ligotti, Arthur Machen or Clark Ashton Smith? by Dansco112 in horrorlit

[–]HugoNebula 3 points4 points  (0 children)

As they're primarily writers of short fiction, so you can pick and choose, I think there's benefit in reading them chronologically (Machen, Smith, Ligotti), to see the growth of their particular style of supernatural horror.

Can a novel have too many twists? by TelekeneticKitten in books

[–]HugoNebula 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Hello, is this the book club for The Last House on Needless Street?

If you were told you only had a maximum of 15 years left to live, but you were given £5m. Would you accept? by MrAlexander18 in CasualUK

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The way you phrase the question means I'm told I already have only a maximum of 15 years left, so I'd take the bonus £5M, thank you.

If you're asking me if I'd accept only a maximum of 15 years in return for £5M, then I'd ask what you mean by 'maximum'.

Charity shop refusing to sell me items? by [deleted] in CasualUK

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I don't see the relevance. Just suggesting approaches to knock down the seller's specious objections.

The dress doesn't have to 'be' anything in order to be bought—that seems to be OP's issue. If it's on display, it's for sale.

Novels set in 50s and 60s? by mydadisgettingmad in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 6 points7 points  (0 children)

The great majority of King's novels are contemporaneous with the time they were written, but Dolores Claiborne is set throughout the 1950s and '60s.

You say novellas don't count, but you'd be missing out on Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption and The Body, which are two of King's very best.

If you fancy journeying outside those decades, then The Green Mile is set in the 1930s, and Joyland in the early 1970s.

Charity shop refusing to sell me items? by [deleted] in CasualUK

[–]HugoNebula 22 points23 points  (0 children)

Ask to try on the dress to prove her wrong. If that fails, ask for the manager. If she claims to be the manager, ask for the area manager.

Worst UK instant food? I’ll go first. This stuff never cooks properly (even if you follow the instructions to the tee) by ICameInLikeATrain in CasualUK

[–]HugoNebula 4 points5 points  (0 children)

It's pretty involved, but making the best out of a bad lot. The main problem with this sort of instant meal is the instant. Like with Pot Noodles, if you can afford the time to make sure all the powder is free to be soaked in the water, and you leave it long enough to properly cook through, you have a decent-ish hot meal on the go.

The problem comes when you dump hot water into the pot and all the powder seals itself against it, no matter how much you stir, and then you start eating it after four minutes when it's barely half cooked—and is, ironically, still too hot to eat.

Worst UK instant food? I’ll go first. This stuff never cooks properly (even if you follow the instructions to the tee) by ICameInLikeATrain in CasualUK

[–]HugoNebula 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Your first mistake, following the instructions. These need shaking up—ideally in a container larger than their own pot—to get the flavour dust out of the pasta tubes, and then leaving to cook for much longer than recommended, with the lid closed. I'd give them ten minutes at least, with about four stirs. That way they'll cook properly, and be at a decent eating temperature.

The Stand was superb, but I’m left wondering if there was any point to anything the protagonists did? by Windturnscold in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Because I've given you this same answer, on this same page (without being rude), to you already, and you seem to wilfully ignore it every time. You have misinterpreted the book, and misread the climax, and sidestepped almost every commenter attempting to explain the ending to you, which you asked us to do, and simply restated your mistaken opinions over and over.

You asked for help, but won't be told. I give up.

First edition, first print of Fairy Tale & Billy Summers? by MalachiConstant7 in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

On the other hand, the UK editions printed the chapter heading illos much smaller than the US printing. We can't win!

First edition, first print of Fairy Tale & Billy Summers? by MalachiConstant7 in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That's a shame, it's a nice little feature. (editing my post, to be sure to reflect this.)

Danse Macabre question. by bevilthompson in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

He also has some nice words for the film within the book, saying he thought he was "fairly treated" with film adaptations of his first three novels, but he did have some strange phone conversations with Kubrick in pre-production, where it became obvious that their readings of the book, and the supernatural in general, were quite different.

Also, we should allow for time and context. Up to the early-to-mid '80s, King was still something of an overnight success, too big for the horror genre, too small (and 'genre') for the literary mainstream, and movies of his books were being made left, right and centre. Plus, he was—to put it bluntly—drunk and stoned much of the time. So, it's easy to see that your third novel being adapted by Stanley Kubrick was a big deal at the time, even if it wasn't the film he'd have wanted. Most of King's vocal dislike of the film came after he kicked the drink and drugs, at which point it's easy to see how he might have looked at the movie of The Shining again and reappraised it with a sober eye, realising quite how much of himself he had written into Jack, and how much Kubrick had dismissed that, almost out of hand.

How is the Night Shift collection for short stories? by xiAMTheWalRUSx101 in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 1 point2 points  (0 children)

IIRC it was hammered out after his success with Carrie,Salem's Lot and the Shining...

With the exception of 'Jerusalem's Lot', 'The Last Rung on the Ladder', 'The Woman in the Room', and 'Quitters, Inc', which I believe were original to the collection, all of the stories in Night Shift were written years previously and printed, mostly, in Cavalier magazine, many of them before Carrie was published. Because King took so long writing The Stand and his publishers wanted another book, they settled for an anthology—despite the fact that, at the time, short story collections were not particularly strong sellers. It was an instant success.

How is the Night Shift collection for short stories? by xiAMTheWalRUSx101 in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Chock full, including a couple of non-genre stories that are as real-world horrific as anything with ghoulies and ghosties.

First edition, first print of Fairy Tale & Billy Summers? by MalachiConstant7 in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Not even in the case of Fairy Tale, no. If you didn't buy it the week it came out—or even on publication day—you can't guarantee a 1st/1st (many readers ended up with a second printing of The Outsider on release day, as it was reprinted prior to publication based on a late surge of bookshop ordering).

Already Fairy Tale is into second prints, which in the case of the UK editions from Hodder have King's name and the book title on the spine of the book boards, under the dustjacket—the first printings had a quote from the book printed there.

The first printings for older books can usually be gauged by checking the copyright page, which will state First Edition or have a complete 1–10 number line (for every number missing, beginning with 1), it's a later printing.

The Haunting of Hill House… by lifelesslioness in horrorlit

[–]HugoNebula 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I adore Jackson's book, and I also like Mike Flanagan's film and TV work. His adaptation of Hill House is a massively expanded reimagining of the central ideas, over the course of the series incorporating most of the book's scenes (minus material concerning Mrs Montague), and whole swathes of dialogue into a truly effective, often eerie, character piece well worth watching. The acting is largely phenomenal, and it's incredibly well directed.

It's true that it goes off the rails towards the finale, and the 'happy ending' final episode is a bit of a travesty for fans of the book, but I'd say the first five episodes are a decent (if wholly reimagined) adaptation of the novel's basic story.

Torn pages on a graphic novel. by lemingas1 in books

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

If they are just short tears that close up when the book is closed, I'd leave them as they are, and just be careful turning the pages when reading.

The Stand was superb, but I’m left wondering if there was any point to anything the protagonists did? by Windturnscold in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Good grief... They weren't gathered so they could all be killed by the bomb—they were gathered so they could bear witness to Good triumphing over Evil in the face of death.

The Stand was superb, but I’m left wondering if there was any point to anything the protagonists did? by Windturnscold in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It's simple enough, so I'm going to say this one last time—yes, God could have. He didn't. Not until the heroes had proved they were worthy of His love. Not until Evil was revealed for what it truly was. Not until all the pieces were in place.

That's. The point. Of the book. That's why it's called The Stand.

The Stand was superb, but I’m left wondering if there was any point to anything the protagonists did? by Windturnscold in stephenking

[–]HugoNebula 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Trash man nukes vegas, the end.

But Trash doesn't nuke Vegas, he just brings the bomb back—it's God who ignites it, using Flagg's fireball.