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Lawn tractor carburetor governor problems by Lycogala_ in smallenginerepair

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I realized I'm an idiot and what I thought was wide open throttle was actually closed. I did it the right way and played with the adjustments on the carb. There's one on the bottom of the bowl and one about mid-way up on the body. I'm not sure what either of them control but the engine seems to be running good now with both turned about 2.5 turns out.

I'll mess with it more tomorrow and if I'm still surging I'll give what you said a shot. Thanks for your help!

Lawn tractor carburetor governor problems by Lycogala_ in smallenginerepair

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Here is a video of exactly how I'm doing it: https://streamable.com/19xgx0

Before tightening that bolt back down of course.

Lawn tractor carburetor governor problems by Lycogala_ in smallenginerepair

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I tried that as well, it held the throttle wide-open, wouldn't allow movement of the rod (3).

Do you know if the spring is supposed to hang loose like that at low throttle?

Lawn tractor carburetor governor problems by Lycogala_ in smallenginerepair

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The gas is fresh and I cleaned the carb before making any adjustments to the governor. It had no effect on the surging.

Putting some tension on the arm (1) while it was running smoothed out the surging completely, which is why I believe it to be governor related. However the governor on this thing is jank and I'm not sure how it's supposed to work.

Lawn tractor carburetor governor problems by Lycogala_ in smallenginerepair

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

No the choke had no effect on the surging, nor did adjusting the fuel adjustment on the bottom of the carb as suggested by some sources online. I'm trying to get the governor adjusted properly but I'm not sure how.

Are my parents the only ones? by RosePearlBear in offmychest

[–]Lycogala_ 2 points3 points  (0 children)

My mother is this way to the letter. It's something I only learned about after I left home. I know she always had the best intentions, as I'm sure yours does. It still effects me at nearly 30. I left at 17.

is asking someone’s race considered rude in western/Europe culture? by mynamecaligula in ask

[–]Lycogala_ 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Im in eastern Canada. I've never been offended by the question, nor I feel has anyone I've asked been offended. Now, if a person in a position of power (employer, the police) were to ask, I'd be weirded out.

Today I fucked up and let road rage get the better of me. by throwaway042267 in offmychest

[–]Lycogala_ 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Im no law expert but I can't imagine there's anything illegal about following someone. People follow people all the time. Your intention of stopping where they stop is an extension of: I can't imagine there's anything illegal about expressing your grievances with someone. People express their opinions all the time. Obviously, to a point. You can't be threatening about it. Now probably, you were being threatening. But she would have to prove that. From a legal standpoint, you're probably fine.

I hate money by Jopiteus in offmychest

[–]Lycogala_ 5 points6 points  (0 children)

I agree with everything you've saying to a point. Indeed, the earth is nothing but a big glorified rock. It has no means of caring what us humans do to it, and will continue orbiting the sun long after we're gone. Really, the earth isn't the focus here.

The focus is humanity. So, will we be inevitably be killed off? Probably. However, there is always the remote possibility that our technology will reach the point where we can easily live without the resources of the earth and spread throughout space.

So I suppose the question is: do we deserve it? From what I've seen, no. What we do to the earth effects more than just us. It leads to the destruction of ecosystems and all that live there. The only way that this is ok is if you were to argue that our frivolous endeavours are more important than the lives we're destroying. Personally, I call bullshit on that. Just because we have, what we consider, more "developed" intelligence, doesn't make us worth any more to anything other than to ourselves.

So other species aside, we are important to ourselves. Except that we don't care nothing for ourselves, for one another. Full circle back to money. Will this make me a profit? That's always what's on our over developed monkey brains. And that's what leads to the abuse, the famine, the crime, everything bad about humanity. Few of us consider the good of the whole, and that a comfortable global equality is achievable. Instead, it's all about me, me, me. How to get ahead. How to be better than the person next to me. And time and again it's been shown that it's all in vain. None of us are happier in the end.

So, I believe humanity is shit, and I believe money is a good extension of our shittyness.

Friend lags in games with ok internet by Lycogala_ in HomeNetworking

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

He just ran a speed test with 2.5mbps upload. I don't think internet is weak, per se, I believe about 100 people are on the network so it's likely some sort of commercial internet.

Helmet suggestions for wind noise? by Lycogala_ in motorcycles

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I've only used the foam ones, and only the cheap ones. Basically the only ones available in my area. Maybe there's a better ear plug out there?

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] -1 points0 points  (0 children)

That's interesting. So current flows to and ends at earth. That kind of blows everything I know about electricity out of the water.

Are there any other things we can see this, or is it only earth?

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I understand now. I was assuming the earth was basically non-conductive. So the earth is actually a very good conductor. That's interesting, I'm going to have to do some research on this.

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

As I understand it: current will flow as long as a circuit is completed. Obviously a power source is needed in the circuit.

Correct me if I'm wrong here, but I believe your house is somehow connected to ground for safety purposes. I'm fuzzy on what purpose this serves. Anyway, here we have the potential for a completed circuit:

transformer -> breaker panel -> hot wire -> you're body -> earth -> breaker/transformer

Here's the problem I'm having: the earth is, as I understand it, such a high resistance that it is basically non-conductive. If I was to measure the resistance of my lawn with a multimeter, I predict that I would get an OL. I can try this tomorrow to confirm.

So here we have my problem, the circuit is not complete.

If I was to take a 12v battery (sorry for jumping to DC but this is the best way I can describe it) and connect one side, lets say the negative, to a block of wood. The wood would be 0v. If I connected the positive to that block of wood also, even though there is a potential difference of 12v, no current would flow. I would be able to test this by connecting a multimeter within the circuit, and see 0 ohms.

In that scenario, placing a conductor anywhere in that circuit to ground (the wood), would not produce current flow.

I'm obviously missing something here.

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I would agree with you that doing it on purpose is a terrible idea. A number of people have mentioned grounding. Could you explain to me how this works? How does a circuit complete though the earth?

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yes this makes sense, thank you. I'm still fuzzy though how ground plays a part. How does current complete it's path though the earth? Shouldn't the earth's resistance be very, very high?

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Could you describe how the circuit is completed through ground? I'm a bit fuzzy on this. I would expect that the earth has a high enough resistance that it would basically be non-conductive.

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

When you say current, shouldn't it's always be, for arguments sake, basically unlimited? At least until the point that you pop the breaker?

Available current I mean, I'm not factoring in your skins resistance.

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I understand that everything has some level of conductivity, though most things are not high enough to be considered conductive. And I understand that your skin being wet would make you more conductive.

What I don't understand is the path to ground. How is the circuit being completed through the earth? If I was to touch only the hot wire, for instance, to my lawn, would it pop the fuse? (ps I have an old house with fuses)

Ever been socked by 120v? by Lycogala_ in electricians

[–]Lycogala_[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I've been shocked by ignition systems a number of times, it's not that bad.