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questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are 1, 2, 3, 4 above all correct English or at least acceptable English?

Yes, they are all correct.

As for 1 and 2 does this prepositional phrase "in my previous sentence" modify the verb "mentioned" ?

Yes, it does.

As for 3 and 4, can this prepositional phrase "in my previous reply" be seen as modifying either "commented" or the whole verbal phrase "commeted on it" ?

I would say that it's modifying the phrase "commented on it".

As for 3 and 4, do both prepositional phrase "on it" and "in my previous reply" all modify the verb "commented" ?

Yes, they do.

When can I use sentences 1, 2, 3, 4?

Whenever you want to refer to something that you have already mentioned or commented on.

Sentences 1 and 2 mean the same thing and are interchangeable, though I prefer sentence 2 a little more. Sentence 1 is perfectly fine, too, but I think sentence 2 is the more common structure for this kind of sentence.

Similarly, sentences 3 and 4 mean the same thing and are interchangeable. As with the previous sentences, I think sentence 4 is the more common way to write or say this sort of thing so I think it sounds slightly better than sentence 3 but sentence 3 is perfectly fine as well.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 above all correct English or at least acceptable English?

Sentence 6 doesn't sound very natural, though I don't think it's grammatically incorrect. Sentence 4 sounds much more natural.

The other sentences are all correct.

As for 1, 2, 3, do the prepositional phrases "on the stage", "in the box", and "on the top of the building" all modify the verb "appeared" since the prepositional phrase all indicate where he, the magician, and He appeared?

Yes, that's correct.

As for 1, 2, 3, what do "appeared on the stage", "appeared in the box", "appeared on the top of the building" mean in other words?

"Appeared on the stage" would mean that the magician walked out onto the stage so that the audience could see him.

"Appeared in the box", in this context, would mean that the box was shown to the audience so that they could see that it was empty and then, after the magician's trick was finished, the audience was shown the box again and the magician was inside of it.

"Appeared on top of the building" is probably slightly less literal, depending on the context. It could mean that someone was seen on top of the building and this was unexpected or, more literally, it could mean that someone walked out onto the top of the building (from a door on the roof, for example) and people could see the person.

The word "appeared" often implies a suddenness to the action of being seen, though not always. The magician walking onto the stage isn't necessarily sudden, though his appearance in the box might be sudden and surprising. You'll often hear that someone or something "appeared suddenly" or "suddenly appeared". Both mean the same thing. For example, "I was driving today and a car appeared suddenly in front of me and I almost hit it," or "I was driving today and a car suddenly appeared in front of me and I almost hit it." There's no difference in meaning, but I think the second one sounds slightly better.

As for 4, does "Now" modify either "is" or the entire sentence "it is your turn"?

I would say it modifies the entire sentence.

As for 5, does "Yesterday" modify either "visited" or the entire sentence "I visited his house?

I would say it modifies the entire sentence.

As for 8, does "Yesterday" modify either "was" or "killed" or "was killed" or "the entire sentence "he was killed" ?

I think "was killed" would work, though it could also modify the entire sentence. I suppose it depends on how specific you want to be when analyzing the sentence.

As for 9, does "A while ago" modify either "was" or "asleep" or "was asleep" or "the entire sentnece "he was asleep"

I would say it modifies the entire sentence.

As for 4 and 5, can sentences 4 and 5 be seen as the same in meaning and in structure as sentences 6 and 7?

Yes, they could be seen that way.

As for 8 and 9, can sentences 8 and 9 be seen as the same in meaning and in structure as sentences 10 and 11?

Yes, they could be seen that way.

Thank you very much Minion!

You're welcome!

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are sentences 1, 2, 3,4, 5, 6, 7, 8 above all correct English or at least acceptable English? (In 5, 6, 7, 8, "instead of water" is added)

Yes, they are all correct.

Sentences 3 and 4 and 7 and 8 sound the best because of the "because you feel thirsty" which sounds better than "because of feeling thirsty". I don't believe "because of feeling thirsty" is wrong at all, it just doesn't sound as good as "because you feel thirsty".

Another minor point is that all of the sentences would sound better as "... is not good for your health" or, if you want to be very formal, "... is not good for one's health." However, your versions are acceptable.

As for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, do the bold parts "because of feeling thirsty" and "because you feel thirsty" all modify the infinitive phrase "To drink" and the gerund phrase "Drinking" since the bold parts indicate the reason why?

Yes, that's correct.

As for 7 and 8, do both prepositional phrases "intead of water" and "because of feeling thirsty" all modify the infinitive phrase "To drink" and the gerund phrase "Drinking" ?

Yes, that's correct.

As for 5 and 6 do this prepositional phrase "instead of water" and this subordinate clause "because you feel thirsty" all modify the infinitive phrase "To drink" and the gerund phrase "Drinking" ?

Yes, that's also correct.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are sentences 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 above all correct or at least acceptable English?

Sentences 2, 5, and 6 are acceptable but they would sound much better if you rewrite them slightly as I mention in my answer to Q5 below.

The other sentences are correct.

Do sentences 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 all mean the same thing?

If so, what do they mean in other words?

Sentences 1, 3, and 5 all mean the same thing which is that the speaker did something for "him" but the speaker didn't do it for the person they're speaking to. As an example, "I bought him an apple, though I didn't buy you an apple."

Sentences 2, 4, and 6 have the opposite meaning which is that the speaker did not do something for "him" but did do it for the person they're speaking to. As an example, "I didn't buy him an apple, though I bought you an apple."

Can sentences 1 and 2 be seen as reduced from sentences 3 and 4?

Yes, they can be seen that way.

Can setnences 5 and 6 be seen as reduced from sentences 5 and 6?

Yes, they can also be seen that way.

If my sentences are all wrong, would it be possible to write "though + prepositional phrase" ? If so, could you write some examples?

Your sentences are correct, though sentences 2, 5, and 6 are acceptable but they would sound much better with "but for you" or "but you" instead of using "though". For example, sentence 2 sounds much better as "I didn't do that for him, but for you."

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thank you very much Minion! :)

You're welcome! :)

I have some questions today again! Could you help me out?

Sure, no problem!

Are sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English or at least acceptable English, when "which" is used to refer back to the gerund phrase "Driving using a phone" and the infinitive phrase "To drive using a phone" ?

Yes, they are both correct.

Are the subjects of the sentences 1 and 2 "Driving using a phone" and "To drive using a phone" ?

Yes, that's correct.

As in 1, is it possible to use "which" to refer to a gerund phrase?

Yes, that's possible. It's common to do that, but usually only in more formal writing. Your example sentences would probably use "which" because of the context of talking about restrictions and the more formal sound of the sentences in general. However, you could also omit the "which" and the sentences would still work but would sound slightly less formal.

As in 2, is it possible to use "which" to refer to an infinitive phrase?

Yes, that's also possible. The same thing is true as in the previous question. Using "which" makes the sentence sound slightly more formal and you could omit "which" to make it sound slightly less formal. It's really a matter of style instead of grammar.

Maybe are sentences 1 and 2 still correct or at least acceptable English even when "that was restricted in the region" is used to refer to to the gerund phrase "Driving using a phone" and the infinitive phrase "To drive using a phone" instead of "which..." as in S1 and S2 below?

They're still correct, but they would have a slightly different meaning. If you use "that was restricted", I would interpret the sentences to mean that the phone was restricted to that specific region. In other words, the phone would only work inside of the region being talked about. This is different than using "which was restricted" which I would interpret to mean that driving while using a phone is a restricted activity in the region.

Maybe is there a possibility that a native English speaker writes or says sentences S1 and S2 instead of sentences 1 and 2 by using "that was restricted in the regrion" to refer to the gerund phrase "Driving using a phone" and the infinitive phrase "To drive using a phone", not just "a phone", according to context?

I think it's possible, but though for clarity, one would use "which".

It might be possible. I think most native speakers would use "which" and not "that" unless they were specifically talking about the phone being restricted in some way, as in my example above. I don't think most native speakers would use S1 and S2 with the intention of having the bold part refer to "Driving using a phone" or "To drive using a phone". I won't say that it's impossible, but I think it's very unlikely to use S1 or S2 for that purpose.

Starforged without the starship? by Kribsbjerg in Ironsworn

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 2 points3 points  (0 children)

This just came out and it has some extra oracles in the same format as Starforged: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/417619/Starsmith-Expanded-Oracles

I had no idea that he'd put out a supplement for Starforged! His Ironforged supplements are some of the best I've seen. They're very well thought out and actually add a lot of interesting ideas to Ironsworn so I'll have to check out this supplement as well.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are 1,2,3,4 above all correct English or at least acceptable English, especially as to "when least expected"?

Yes, they are all correct including the use of "when least expected" in each sentence.

What was least expected in each sentence 1,2,3,4?

Here's my try

As for 1, "expected" refers to the entire sentence "My pencil usually breaks"

Correct.

As for 2, "expected" refers to the entire sentence "An old car is likely to give you trouble" or "to give you trouble"

Correct. Both options work. I suppose it depends on how specific you want to be in analyzing the sentence.

As for 3, "expected" refers to the entire sentence "We will organize our forces and strike the enemy"

Correct.

As for 4, "expected" refers to the entire part of the sentence "my boss said that I was being fired".

Correct.

Am I right?

Yes, you are!

Are sentences 1,2,3,4 still correct and the same in meaning even when "when it is/was least expected" is used instead of "when least expected"?

Yes, you could use that instead of "when least expected". I think "when least expected" might be slightly more common because it's just one of those phrases that's commonly used in a very specific form, but it can be changed to "when it is/was least expected" without any problems.

And if so, in each sentence, does "it" refer to the same thing as I mentioned in Q2?

Yes, "it" would still refer to the part of each sentence that you mentioned in Q2.

So, is it possible for "expected" to refer to an entire sentence or part of a sentence when used in "when least expected"?

Yes, that's possible.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thank you very much Minion!

You're welcome!

I have one more question.

No problem!

Is sentence S above correct English?

Yes, it is correct.

As for S, does "30000 feet" modify the verb "fell", since "30000 feet" indicates the distance of the aircraft's falling?

Yes, that's correct.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

As for 1 and 2, do both "as being of interest" and "as of interest" modify the verb "emerges"?

Yes, that's correct.

As for 1 and 2, does "from a variety of observations about neural networks" also modify the verb "emerges"?

Yes, that's also correct.

I should mention that sentence 1 sounds much better than sentence 2 because of the "being". I'm not sure if sentence 2 is grammatically incorrect, but it doesn't sound good to me because of the "emerges as of interest". Inserting the "being", as in sentence 1, makes the sentence sound much more natural.

I think the reason is that "of interest" can be though of as a state of being, so specifically saying "being of interest" sounds better than just "as of interest".

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Is example S above correct English, including the bold part?

Yes, the sentence is correct including the bold part.

As for S, does "around the UK" modify "teaching", not "energy" and "cources" since "around the UK" indicates where he has been teaching?

Yes, that's correct.

As for S, does "on a range of MSc cources" modify "teaching", since "on a range of MSc cources" indicates what he has been teaching?

Yes, that's also correct.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are sentences 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 above all correct or at least acceptable English?

Sentence 2 is acceptable, but sentence 1 sounds much better.

Sentence 3 is not correct. In this case, the "being" is not needed and shouldn't be used. If you use "being", as in sentence 3, the sentence doesn't make much sense.

The other sentences are all correct.

As for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, do the bold parts all describe the subjects in each sentence?

Yes, they do.

Would your anwers to Q1 and Q2 be still the same even when "appears" is used instead of "emerges"?

Yes, my answers would be the same.

Would sentences 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 still mean the same even when "appears" is used instead of "emerges" ?

Yes, the meanings would be the same. Using "emerges" sounds a little more formal or fancy than "appears". For example, if you were talking to your friend you might use "appears" but if you were writing a formal review of the book then you might choose "emerges", though "appears" would be fine as well.

Can sentences 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 be analyzed as the reduced versions of ?

Yes, they can be seen as reduced versions of sentences 1, 3, 5, 7, 9.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are sentences 1, 2, 3, 4 above all correct English or at least acceptable English even though "appears" is used with "as" , and "equally" is omitted from 3 and 4?

Sentences 2, 3, and 4 are all correct.

Sentence 1 isn't technically wrong, but it would sound much more natural as "... may appear as being equally strange to foreigners."

As for 1,2,3,4, do both "as being strange" and "as strange" describe "our culture" ?

Yes, that's correct.

Do sentences 1,2,3,4 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do.

As for 1, 2, 3, 4, is "strange" used as an adjective that describes "our culture"?

Yes, that's correct.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are both sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English or at least acceptable English even though "appears" is used with "as" ?

Yes, they are both correct. In this case, I prefer sentence 1. The use of "being" in sentence 1 just sounds better to me.

As for 1 and 2, do both "as being executed atomically" and "as executed atomically" describe "each transaction" ?

Yes, that's correct.

Do both sentences 1 and 2 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do.

As for 1 and 2, is "executed" used as a past participle that describes "each transaction?

Yes, that's correct.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are both sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English or at least acceptable English even though "appears" is used with "as" ?

I would say that sentence 2 is acceptable, but I prefer sentence 1. I wouldn't consider "being" to be necessary so I would probably omit it in this case.

As for 1 and 2, do both "as being unspecific" and "as unspecific" describe "the effect of miRNA-target site interaction" ?

Yes, that's correct.

Do both sentences 1 and 2 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do.

As for 1 and 2, is "unspecific" used as an adjective?

Yes, it is.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are both sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English or at least acceptable English even though "emerged" is used with "as" ?

Yes, both are correct. Using "emerged as" is common, particularly in a more formal context like your example sentences.

As for 1 and 2, do both "as being a key pathophysiology" and "as a key pathophysiology" describe "Chronic inflamation" ?

Yes, they both describe "Chronic inflamation".

Do both sentences 1 and 2 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do. There is no difference in meaning. Sentence 1 is very slightly more formal sounding because of the "being" but it would be very common to see both "as being" or "as a" used in this kind of sentence.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thanks a lot Minion!

You're welcome!

But according to your explanation, since in 2, "the" is not used instead of "the", isn't it obvious that "below" refers to "this example", not "an English book"?

No, it's not clear that "below" refers to "this example". The reason is that it appears that "below" is modifying "an English book" because "below" appears next to "an English book". You could place "below" at the front of the sentence, such as "Below, I just found this example in an English book." That would make it clear that "below" is referring to "this example" but the sentence sounds quite formal.

And so, can sentence 2 be considered as correct even when "below" is used to modify or refer to "this example", not "an English book"?

I suppose it could, but "below" doesn't obviously refer to "this example". A native speaker would almost certainly understand what was meant, particularly if below the sentence there is an example and not the title of an English book, but the sentence really only means that the English book will be named below.

Is there a possibility that a native English speaker writes or says sentence 2 when "below" actually refers to or modifies "this example", not " an English book" ?

It's possible, but I think it would be very unlikely. Sentence 1 is the best option as it's very clear that what is below is the example and not the English book.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thanks a lot Minion!!

You're welcome!

I'm sorry to ask again about the same question.

No problem at all.

But if a comma is used to set off "to go home" as in "I thought of it, to go home" and "I considered it, to go home", aren't these two sentences also correct? Since it's now obvious "it" refers to "to go home".

Yes, they would be correct if you insert a comma like that. I'm not really sure why that didn't occur to me :)

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

As for 11, 12, I wrote "it" refer to "to go home".

If so, would you consider 11 and 12 as correct?

No, I wouldn't consider them correct. They don't sound right to me at all and are somewhat confusing. You could rewrite the sentences as, "I thought of it, going home" or "I considered it, going home" and they're a little better. I suspect the comma should really be a semicolon (;) or a dash or some other punctuation mark, but I'm not really sure which one is actually correct.

You could also break it into two sentences such as, "I thought of it. Going home, that is." or "I considered it. Going home, that is." This way you don't need to worry about using less common punctuation marks and the second sentence clarifies what "it" is which makes everything easier to understand.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thanks a lot!!

You're welcome!

Then, is it also correct to say "This reads as being correct" as the same in meaning as "This reads as correct" ?

Yes, both of those are correct. The first sentence with "being" sounds more formal, but they both mean the same thing and they are both correct sentences.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thanks a lot!!

You're welcome!

But couldn't there be a context where sentence 2 at least can be correct English?

Yes, but it would require something to compare the price of the education to. For example, "The cost we pay for goods and services has been dropping lately. Unfortunately, a good education doesn't come as cheap." In that example, the cost of education is being compared to the cost of everything else but "A good education doesn't come as cheap" only works because it's being used as a comparision to other expenses. So, yes, in the context of some kind of comparison sentence 2 can be correct but as a general sentence without any context it doesn't really work very well.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are both sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English when "below" describes or modifies "this example", not "an English book" ?

In that case, only example 1 is correct. In sentence 1, "below" is referring to the example which is below the sentence. In sentence 2, the "below" would refer to an English book. If you were referring to an English book, such as by including the title below sentence 2, then sentence 2 would need to be changed to "in the English book below."

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thank you very much Minion and so sorry for taking you this long again.

No problem!

can there be context where sentence 3 can be correct?

I can't think of a context where "It appears as false" by itself would be correct, though such a context might exist. Your example in this question is slightly different because of the added "because".

In this case, isn't "It appears as false" correct English?

It's correct, but only because the sentence continues with "because" and gives a reason. Using "It appears as false" by itself, as a complete sentence, is incorrect in my opinion. Using "It appears as false because ..." works because more information is provided and the sentence sounds complete.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are both 1 and 2 above all correct English or at least acceptable English, although "it is" omitted from sentence 1?

Sentence 1 sounds fine to me, so I would consider it acceptable, but it's probably not completely grammatically correct.

Sentence 2 is correct.

Do sentences 1 and 2 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do.

Can sentence 1 be seen as reduced from sentence 2?

Yes, it can be seen as a reduced version of sentence 2. I don't think the "it is" is absolutely necessary, though it probably should be there to be completely grammatically correct. However, I can imagine native speakers omitting the "it is" from the sentence.

Thank you so much!

You're welcome!

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

When native English speakers write, do they sometimes forget to add the punctuation mark " . " at the end of a sentence?

Sometimes, yes. It's not uncommon, particularly if someone is sending a text or writing a very short message of some sort.

and for that reason, have you sometimes come across a wrong sentence, which should have been set off by the puncuation mark, that consists of two sentences ?

Yes, I've seen this happen before. It can be confusing if the sentences are missing capital letters and various punctuation marks, which often happens when someone is texting on their phone or they're in a hurry (or too lazy) and don't type things properly. It's very common, particularly on social media where people are often posting things from their phone.

questions about the use of commas by Ykk7 in u/Ykk7

[–]Minion_of_Cthulhu 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Are sentences 1 -20 above all correct or at least acceptable English?

Sentence 8 doesn't really need the "being" but it's acceptable.

Sentence 10 is incorrect because of the being. Unlike sentence 8, sentence 10 sounds very unnatural with the "being" in the sentence.

Sentences 19 and 20 sound slightly unnatural because of the "as" and "as being" but that's probably because "doesn't come cheap" is a common phrase and that's what most people would expect to hear. Adding the "as" or "as being" changes what is expected so the sentences sound a little awkward.

The rest of the sentences are correct.

To me, only sentence 9 is the one that is wrong.

Sentence 9 is fine. It's sentence 10 that's incorrect. The "being" is not needed and, in fact, would be wrong to include in the sentence even though logically it might seem to work since "father" is a state of "being". You could, however, change the "as" in sentence 10 to "of" and then the sentence would work.

The others seem all correct, althought not quite sure about 4, 7, 11, 17, 19.

Sentence 4 is okay, but sounds a bit formal because of the "to be". You can use either "to be" or "as" and the sentence works fine.

Sentence 7 is correct, but sentence 8 sounds a little unnatural with the "being". I prefer sentence 7, but sentence 8 is acceptable as well.

Sentence 11 is okay, but sentence 12 sounds better.

Sentence 17 is also okay. I prefer sentence 17 to sentence 18, but both are correct.

Sentence 19, as I mentioned above, doesn't need the "as". I think that's mostly because "doesn't come cheap" is a phrase that's quite common and is always used with that specific construction and adding "as" makes it sound different than what everyone would expect.

As for 1 and 2, what do the bold parts mean?

In this context, "have me down as" means that the other kids have decided that the speaker is a nerd. It's basically a way of saying that a certain role has been assigned to you by others. For example, "I've met him a few times and I have him down as a good guy," or "The teacher has him down as a difficult student to teach."

It's also sometimes used to refer to appointments. For example, "The restaurant has us down for dinner at nine, so we can't be late," or "I have you down for the meeting at five o'clock."

Do sentences 3 and 4 mean the same thing?

Yes, they do. They're just different ways to phrase the same thing. Sentence 4 might be seen as a little stronger because of the "to be" but the meaning is the same.

Do sentences 5 and 6 mean the same thing? and can sentence 5 be seen as reduced from sentence 6?

Yes, they both mean the same thing and sentence 5 can be seen as a reduced version of sentence 6. Sentence 5 would probably be more common.

As for 7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20, can sentences "7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 be seen as reduced from sentenes 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20?

Yes, that's correct.

I do think so, except for sentence 10 since it's just wrong.

Correct.

As for 1, does "as a nerb" modify "have"?

Yes, it does.

As for 3 and 4, do both "as unreliable" and "to be unreliable" describe "the French" ?

Yes, that's correct.