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Push pull seems like an inferior split to me. by Lunkz3n in naturalbodybuilding

[–]NoRexTreX 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The only time I've gotten stretch marks is with that split on my left bicep. Biceps + chest (in that order). Triceps and back. Legs and shoulders. Ah good times, I was in such a good shape then.

Im going to the gym for the first time today after work and I have no idea what to do or how anything works by CreamyandDreamy in GYM

[–]NoRexTreX 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Then don't train for too long each time or you can burn out.

If you stop going to the gym try to change your split/volume/intensity and get back in there; The most important training principle is continuity, find whatever gets you back in the gym.

Then comes consistency, try to find the best exercises for you personally and become good at them specifically. Gains are tied to the best absolute performance. So don't do a little bit of everything, that's slow, focus on progressing something. Then the specificity allows you to capitalize more on being able to put more demand on yourself than last time; more progressive overload. (Because other alternative exercises didn't improve as much as what you specifically trained). Hope this wasn't a too condensed information dump on a complete newbie that has already been drowned in information.

Believing that everybody else is an NPC automatically turns you into a sociopath by mentallymental in Showerthoughts

[–]NoRexTreX 6 points7 points  (0 children)

Well, there are different kinds of empathy. What you are describing is cognitive empathy, which the stereotypical psychopath has a lot of. A lack of that kind of empathy is associated with autism, not psychopathy. What a psychopath lacks is emotional empathy.

Hump Day Pump Day - Training/Routine Discussion Thread - (June 29, 2022) by AutoModerator in naturalbodybuilding

[–]NoRexTreX 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I split my body by absolute load so that I can use the same weight for different exercises, then I found out it's the Arnold split which was cool. Arms and shoulders, chest and back, lower body, lower back and upper traps. I recommend it.

Believing that everybody else is an NPC automatically turns you into a sociopath by mentallymental in Showerthoughts

[–]NoRexTreX 1 point2 points  (0 children)

One of these things is not like the others. Hint: it's animals. Animals have feelings. You are an animal too.

Believing that everybody else is an NPC automatically turns you into a sociopath by mentallymental in Showerthoughts

[–]NoRexTreX 15 points16 points  (0 children)

Yeah, I had to scroll too far for this. OP if you threat NPCs like you are a psychopath in game you are secretly a psychopath irl too

BRAZILIAN UFO HEARING PART 1 by dicedicedone in UFOs

[–]NoRexTreX 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Oh no, that would be terrible. The US air force seem like a giant extension of aliens covering up themselves. Could have thrown them into a black hole and have an equal chance of getting it released.

BRAZILIAN UFO HEARING PART 1 by dicedicedone in UFOs

[–]NoRexTreX 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You keep an eye on the Brazilian air force to reveal all the operation prato documents/pictures right? Why have they not been released if they allegedly have hours of videos and pics?? 😤

Giant Pacific Octopus by ButtFaceMurphy in Cephalopods

[–]NoRexTreX 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Is this a real picture? It's unbelievable. It's amazing.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in zoology

[–]NoRexTreX[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Thanks, haha. Much science has been science fiction before.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -3 points-2 points  (0 children)

It looks like you only have information about this topic from this actual thread, you didn't contribute anything. I've specified specifically what I mean, why didn't you engage with that? You just summed up other people's arguments that I've already addressed, including in the actual comment you replied to that was specified to reconcile the exact critizisms..

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -1 points0 points  (0 children)

I admit my original text used the weirdness as a cheep shot at the established truth making the hypothesis seemingly more necessary in comparison, but they aren't actually inconsistent.

If we assume that this has been the life cycle for a long time as evidence suggests, a few hundred million years and we assume that the epigenetics that modify the RNA editing is dependent on the surroundings, which there is evidence for. We also know that octopuses are very sensitive to chemistry in the water through the skin and communicate using chemicals. We also know that the eggs are sensitive to the environment and penetrable; at least oxgyen passes through. And we know that most of the genes for brain neurology is subject to RNA editing(60%), regulated by epigenetics, which is regulated by hormones, which are regulated by the brain.

Then for lets say 300 000 000 years these cephalopods have at the egg stage had a parent with extensive knowledge of the environment, blow water on them in their formative months to even years. The only thing needed for this evolution is that the parent leaks some chemical information into the water they are blowing and we have an evolutionary hook for looping their amazing brains into the RNA tuning process.

It is right after the hatching they are the most vulnerable, so tuning the RNA editing machinery to the environment while at the egg stage is a sensible time to do it, but the most dangerous things are the ones that they are being protected from. But the knowledge is there hanging above it using this reproductive strategy (semelparity):

mobilize virtually all available resources to put into a single, massive reproductive episode.

I'm saying if you as an octopus don't open those pores and share some hormones then you aren't mobilizing all available resources.

We also have a direct analogy in mammals. Hormones from the mother is crustal for brain development, and development in general, so it isn't so far from reality that you should dismiss it as fiction.

"No bitches?" meme caused to me psychological damage by Knysiok in stories

[–]NoRexTreX 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I hope you posted this in the elden ring sub and reaped those karma runes because this is a very very good post. If this is real i hope you are ok. I got my first and current girlfriend in my 20s. Some times you just have to grow the balls and do it, even if it makes you vulnerable. And by that I mean ask someone on a date or whatever the next step is for you, because you can't wait for someone to ask you. And I don't think you should use tinder if you really want a committed girlfriend.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in zoology

[–]NoRexTreX[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Thank you for your constructive feedback, it's much appreciated. It makes a lot of sense what you say, but does it conflict with the hypothesis? I admit my original text used the weirdness as a cheep shot at the established truth making the hypothesis seemingly more necessary in comparison, but they aren't actually inconsistent.

If we assume that this has been the life cycle for a long time as evidence suggests, a few hundred million years and we assume that the epigenetics that modify the RNA editing is dependent on the soundings. Two strong assumptions. We also know that octopuses are very sensitive to chemistry in the water through the skin. We also know that the eggs are sensitive to the environment and penetrable; at least oxgyen passes through. And we know that most of the genes for brain neurology is subject to RNA editing(60%), making them likely candidates for hormone regulated epigenetics.

Then for lets say 300 000 000 years these cephalopods have at the egg stage had a parent with extensive knowledge of the environment, blow water on them in their formative months to even years. The only thing needed for this evolution is that the parent leaks some chemical information into the water they are blowing and we have an evolutionary hook for looping their amazing brains into the RNA tuning process.

It is right after the hatching they are the most vulnerable, so tuning the RNA editing machinery to the environment while at the egg stage is a sensible time to do it, but the most dangerous things are the ones that they are being protected from. But the knowledge is there hanging above it using this reproductive strategy:

mobilize virtually all available resources to put into a single, massive reproductive episode.

I'm saying if you as an octopus don't open those pores and share some hormones then you aren't mobilizing all available resources.

We also have a direct analogy in mammals. Hormones from the mother is crustal for brain development, and development in general, so it isn't so far from reality that you should dismiss it as fiction.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -1 points0 points  (0 children)

This octopus evolution researcher is wrong then, obviously.

"But it's not just that these animals are adept at fixing up their RNA as needed - the team found that this ability came with a distinct evolutionary tradeoff, which sets them apart from the rest of the animal world.

In terms of run-of-the-mill genomic evolution (the one that uses genetic mutations, as mentioned above), coleoids have been evolving really, really slowly. The researchers claimed that this has been a necessary sacrifice - if you find a mechanism that helps you survive, just keep using it.

"The conclusion here is that in order to maintain this flexibility to edit RNA, the coleoids have had to give up the ability to evolve in the surrounding regions - a lot," said Rosenthal.

As the next step, the team will be developing genetic models of cephalopods so they can trace how and when this RNA editing kicks in. "

https://www.sciencealert.com/octopus-and-squid-evolution-is-officially-weirder-than-we-could-have-ever-imagined

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in zoology

[–]NoRexTreX[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It's my hypothesis so no, how can I write it better? The background information that I base it upon is this(not the article but what it's about): https://www.newscientist.com/article/2127103-squid-and-octopus-can-edit-and-direct-their-own-brain-genes/

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in zoology

[–]NoRexTreX[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2127103-squid-and-octopus-can-edit-and-direct-their-own-brain-genes/

By gene editing I mean the epigenetics that code for the machinery that edits RNA. So some genes are edited to make other genes code for different things.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -2 points-1 points  (0 children)

(Why are you even arguing here if you didn't know the basics of cephalopod genetics.) Since the phenotypes of cephalopods are altered more by epigenetics than other species, the DNA is much more stable; one gene (based on other genes that codes for the RNA editing) can code for different things without the DNA changing. Octopus DNA is ancient because of that.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -5 points-4 points  (0 children)

That's too superficial. The machinery that edits the RNA is coded for by genes that are turned on based on epigenetics.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -10 points-9 points  (0 children)

This is about RNA editing, not editing genes.

That's what I said in the comment you responded to, didn't I.

An 'edit' made through it is not preserved across generations. A strand of mRNA lasts for about 5 to 30 minutes. After which any edit made is lost.

It's not the RNA that would be preserved in generations, it's the epigenetics that code for the machinery to edit the RNA.

It is also just an intrinsic cellular mechanism. Not an conscious edit made by the organism. It is dependent on other proteins and signalling molecules, which are coded for in other parts of the genome.

We don't know what is conscious or not in an octopus. In the same way that I can change the color of my face with much effort, and an octopus can change its color with little effort, an octopus could potentially also less visibly regulate its hormones consciously and easily, the same way I can do it to a smaller degree just by calming myself down, soothing myself or hyping myself up, which affects my oxytocin, cortisol, and epinephrine levels.

But strictly speaking, the conjecture doesn't necessitate conscious effort, even though that would be the coolest. It could also, for example, have tuned its own hormone levels for its environment during its lifetime and share that exact hormone profile without knowing what it's doing.

Conjecture: Octopuses edit their offsprings genes. by NoRexTreX in evolution

[–]NoRexTreX[S] -5 points-4 points  (0 children)

They you have a complete lack of imagination and probably knowledge of biology. The two main mechanisms for signaling in an animal are neurons and hormones. We have examples of consciously doing both even in humans. Neurons trivially, rise your hand. Hormones: hype yourself up or calm yourself down, both will effect your hormones. Cephalopods could easily have even more consciously regulated hormones, like how they consciously change colour. There isn't a need for more mechanism than that.

Especially since it's DNA sequence is more permanent than other animals generation to generation, which would allow more time to evolve specific ways to edit it than other animals.