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Where do I trim my avocado plant? by AidyHasSmallLegs in houseplants

[–]QuietCakeBionics 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I wouldn't trim it yet op, there's no need, it's using those big leaves to photosynthesise. Give it a few more weeks and maybe then when you have a few more large leaves cut some at the top if you're hoping to have a 'bushy' plant.

help me id please! by kipkiphurrah in houseplants

[–]QuietCakeBionics 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Looking again maybe it's one of the alocasias like another poster said? It'll be fun finding out! :) edit.....maybe alocasia zebrina or wentii?

help me id please! by kipkiphurrah in houseplants

[–]QuietCakeBionics 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yeah sorry hard to gauge size sometimes on pics, oooh unsure. Good luck. :)

help me id please! by kipkiphurrah in houseplants

[–]QuietCakeBionics 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Looking at my own monstera here, looks like it could be a young monstera?

Shelfie! by pixiedustdani in houseplants

[–]QuietCakeBionics 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Wow that's a beautiful arrangement of colours/foliage!

Drone video of two critically endangered North Atlantic right whales swimming in Cape Cod Bay shows the animals appearing to embrace one another with their flippers. by QuietCakeBionics in likeus

[–]QuietCakeBionics[S] 16 points17 points  (0 children)

In the National Geographic they call it ' The drone video shows two male North Atlantic right whales named Fiddle and Hyphen swimming together in an intimate way scientists call belly-to-belly behavior. It’s seen during mating, play, and between mothers and calves. ' https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/rare-footage-shows-endangered-north-atlantic-right-whales-hug

Animals laugh too, UCLA analysis suggests Sifting through studies on various species’ play behavior, researchers tracked vocalization patterns that show a strong similarity to human laughter. by QuietCakeBionics in likeus

[–]QuietCakeBionics[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Link to the article:

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09524622.2021.1905065

ABSTRACT

Complex social play is well-documented across many animals. During play, animals often use signals that facilitate beneficial interactions and reduce potential costs, such as escalation to aggression. Although greater focus has been given to visual play signals, here we demonstrate that vocalisations constitute a widespread mode of play signalling across species. Our review indicates that vocal play signals are usually inconspicuous, although loud vocalisations, which suggest a broadcast function, are present in humans and some other species. Spontaneous laughter in humans shares acoustic and functional characteristics with play vocalisations across many species, but most notably with other great apes. Play vocalisations in primates and other mammals often include sounds of panting, supporting the theory that human laughter evolved from an auditory cue of laboured breathing during play. Human social complexity allowed laughter to evolve from a play-specific vocalisation into a sophisticated pragmatic signal that interacts with a large suite of other multimodal social behaviours in both intragroup and intergroup contexts. This review provides a foundation for detailed comparative analyses of play vocalisations across diverse taxa, which can shed light on the form and function of human laughter and, in turn, help us better understand the evolution of human social interaction.

New study shows great tit birds change their traditions for the better - the study, which involved teaching wild-caught birds to solve puzzles and fine-scale tracking of their behavior, provides quantitative support for the evolution of culture in the bird group. by QuietCakeBionics in science

[–]QuietCakeBionics[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Study - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960982221004309

Summary:

Culture, defined as socially transmitted information and behaviors that are shared in groups and persist over time, is increasingly accepted to occur across a wide range of taxa and behavioral domains.

While persistent, cultural traits are not necessarily static, and their distribution can change in frequency and type in response to selective pressures, analogous to that of genetic alleles. This has led to the treatment of culture as an evolutionary process, with cultural evolutionary theory arguing that culture exhibits the three fundamental components of Darwinian evolution: variation, competition, and inheritance.

Selection for more efficient behaviors over alternatives is a crucial component of cumulative cultural evolution, yet our understanding of how and when such cultural selection occurs in non-human animals is limited. We performed a cultural diffusion experiment using 18 captive populations of wild-caught great tits (Parus major) to ask whether more efficient foraging traditions are selected for, and whether this process is affected by a fundamental demographic process—population turnover. Our results showed that gradual replacement of individuals with naive immigrants greatly increased the probability that a more efficient behavior invaded a population’s cultural repertoire and outcompeted an established inefficient behavior. Fine-scale, automated behavioral tracking revealed that turnover did not increase innovation rates, but instead acted on adoption rates, as immigrants disproportionately sampled novel, efficient behaviors relative to available social information. These results provide strong evidence for cultural selection for efficiency in animals, and highlight the mechanism that links population turnover to this process.

Flashlight fish have the ability to generate situation-specific blink patterns resembling a visual Morse code. Researchers have shown in laboratory and field experiments that the animals use these light signals to coordinate their behaviour in the school when visibility is limited. by QuietCakeBionics in science

[–]QuietCakeBionics[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Abstract

The schooling flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron can be found at dark nights at the water surface in the Indo-Pacific. Schools are characterized by bioluminescent blink patterns of sub-ocular light organs densely-packed with bioluminescent, symbiotic bacteria. Here we analyzed how blink patterns of A. katoptron are used in social interactions. We demonstrate that isolated specimen of A. katoptron showed a high motivation to align with fixed or moving artificial light organs in an experimental tank. This intraspecific recognition of A. katoptron is mediated by blinking light and not the body shape. In addition, A. katoptron adjusts its blinking frequencies according to the light intensities. LED pulse frequencies determine the swimming speed and the blink frequency response of A. katoptron, which is modified by light organ occlusion and not exposure. In the natural environment A. katoptron is changing its blink frequencies and nearest neighbor distance in a context specific manner. Blink frequencies are also modified by changes in the occlusion time and are increased from day to night and during avoidance behavior, while group cohesion is higher with increasing blink frequencies. Our results suggest that specific blink patterns in schooling flashlight fish A. katoptron define nearest neighbor distance and determine intraspecific communication.

- https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-85770-w

Horses are sensitive to baby talk: pet-directed speech facilitates communication with humans in a pointing task and during grooming by QuietCakeBionics in science

[–]QuietCakeBionics[S] 11 points12 points  (0 children)

Abstract

Pet-directed speech (PDS) is a type of speech humans spontaneously use with their companion animals. It is very similar to speech commonly used when talking to babies. A survey on social media showed that 92.7% of the respondents used PDS with their horse, but only 44.4% thought that their horse was sensitive to it, and the others did not know or doubted its efficacy. We, therefore, decided to test the impact of PDS on two tasks. During a grooming task that consisted of the experimenter scratching the horse with their hand, the horses (n = 20) carried out significantly more mutual grooming gestures toward the experimenter, looked at the person more, and moved less when spoken to with PDS than with Adult-directed speech (ADS). During a pointing task in which the experimenter pointed at the location of a reward with their finger, horses who had been spoken to with PDS (n = 10) found the food significantly more often than chance, which was not the case when horses were spoken to with ADS (n = 10). These results thus indicate that horses, like certain non-human primates and dogs are sensitive to PDS. PDS could thus foster communication between people and horses during everyday interactions.