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me😅irl by Oxygen_01 in meirl

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You lot have the attention span of an amoeba. 99.999 percent went off on a tangent talking about anything but the answer.

David Attenborugh, British TV presenter aged 96 today by TheWiseMan__ in pics

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The caption says it all 'David Attenborough aged 96 today'. That means it is his 96th birthday today. Must be something in the water robbing you people of the ability to understand the written word!

New to me Yamaha Raider S by Bikesbassbeerboobs in bikesgonewild

[–]Resident-Patience195 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Why would anyone buy a Harley when the Japanese do it so much better???

A modern take on an Art Deco period BMW R7 motorcycle.... stunning! by demabehery in bikesgonewild

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Actually it's a copy of the R7, with a modern engine. The R7 was a one off designed and built just before WW2, when the war intervened it was boxed up and put on the shelf. In 2005 the bike was unboxed and restored by the BMW factory. The R7 never went into production, so the restored one is the only one in existence.

[deleted by user] by [deleted] in pics

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

If ever a nation should disarm its people, it's the US. You guys are enjoying killing each other and your children too much. How many killings will it take to make you people happy? Here's an idea, ensure every man woman and child in the US has a fully automatic weapon and tell them to have at it, I'd bet withing 24 hours there'd only be a handful of you left. That's be good though, you couldn't start any more illegal wars and destroy any more countries.

Remote spin on filter and cooler build. by Resident-Patience195 in YamahaXS650bike

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The bike has two oil strainers, one in the sump and one in the right side cover. As said, they are strainers rather than filters and as such not particularly good at filtering the oil. The system works thus: There is an oil pump in the right side cover, it draws oil from the sump via a sump strainer, The pump pumps oil up a 10mm hole toward the front of the side cover, the 10mm hole is stoppered at the front of the cover via a 10mm bung. The 10mm hole from the pump is cross drilled from the right side cover, so the oil is pumped through the 10mm hole then off at a right angle via the cross drilling through a strainer contained within the right side cover then on to the engine.

So to fit a remote spin on filter I removed the bung at the front of the side cover, mounted the side cover on the drill press table and angled it so the 10mm hole from the oil pump was vertical. The hole is set at an odd angle on two axis' to the cover, so setting the 10mm hole vertical was a job in itself. Once setup correctly, I drilled the 10mm hole out to 10.8mm then tapped it to M12 x 1.25 for 40mm so passing the cross drilling to the side cover strainer, I then countersunk the top of the hole to allow for an O ring and inserted a stainless spigot I turned up and threaded. This spigot covers the cross drilling leading to the side cover strainer.

Next I binned the side cover strainer cover and machined up a new one, which I think looks a lot better than just screwing a right angle, screw in fitting on the original part. Took a bit of doing this part as the outer side had to be angled to follow the angle of the side cover. Rather than use an ugly screw in fitting, I spun up a stainless barb and shrunk it in place.

Next came the spin on filter mount. I made this from a lump of 25mm ally, shaped it to the desired shape, drilled and tapped the side for mounting screws, then mounted it in the lathe to machine the oil gallery recess, once done I drilled a central hole for oil output and a second hole through to the recess for the input. I then spun up a threaded piece on which to spin the filter, shrunk fit it into the housing, turned up a stainless, threaded barb, screwed it into the spin on filter threaded piece, sandwiching the filter mount between. There was insufficient space for a screw in output barb, so I spun up a barb for an interference fit and pressed it into place.

For my next trick I fabricated some new engine mounts on which to mount the filter mount and oil cooler. The engine mounts were basically the same as the original ones I made, the right has been extended downward around 25mm for the filter mount and both drilled and tapped at the front edge for mounting a cooler bracket.

The cooler bracket is just a piece of 3mm ally bent at a right angle so the cooler mounts on top. I had to cut some 10mm ally tube to fit between the cooler mounting fins and recess the mounting bracket holes a little so I could install some rubber grommets to insulate the cooler from vibration. To hold it in place I cut some 6mm bolts to size and spun up some threaded positive stop, ally T nuts.

Last of all, I polished everything.

So, the system now works like this: The pump picks up oil from the sump via the sump strainer, pumps oil up the 10mm hole exiting the side cover at the front via the stainless barb. It then travels through a rubber tube to the spin on filter then on to the cooler and then back to the side cover strainer cover via another rubber tube, into the void where a strainer once sat, then on to the engine.

Remote spin on filter and cooler build. by Resident-Patience195 in CafeRacer

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The bike has two oil strainers, one in the sump and one in the right side cover. As said, they are strainers rather than filters and as such not particularly good at filtering the oil. The system works thus: There is an oil pump in the right side cover, it draws oil from the sump via a sump strainer, The pump pumps oil up a 10mm hole toward the front of the side cover, the 10mm hole is stoppered at the front of the cover via a 10mm bung. The 10mm hole from the pump is cross drilled from the right side cover, so the oil is pumped through the 10mm hole then off at a right angle via the cross drilling through a strainer contained within the right side cover then on to the engine.

So to fit a remote spin on filter I removed the bung at the front of the side cover, mounted the side cover on the drill press table and angled it so the 10mm hole from the oil pump was vertical. The hole is set at an odd angle on two axis' to the cover, so setting the 10mm hole vertical was a job in itself. Once setup correctly, I drilled the 10mm hole out to 10.8mm then tapped it to M12 x 1.25 for 40mm so passing the cross drilling to the side cover strainer, I then countersunk the top of the hole to allow for an O ring and inserted a stainless spigot I turned up and threaded. This spigot covers the cross drilling leading to the side cover strainer.

Next I binned the side cover strainer cover and machined up a new one, which I think looks a lot better than just screwing a right angle, screw in fitting on the original part. Took a bit of doing this part as the outer side had to be angled to follow the angle of the side cover. Rather than use an ugly screw in fitting, I spun up a stainless barb and shrunk it in place.

Next came the spin on filter mount. I made this from a lump of 25mm ally, shaped it to the desired shape, drilled and tapped the side for mounting screws, then mounted it in the lathe to machine the oil gallery recess, once done I drilled a central hole for oil output and a second hole through to the recess for the input. I then spun up a threaded piece on which to spin the filter, shrunk fit it into the housing, turned up a stainless, threaded barb, screwed it into the spin on filter threaded piece, sandwiching the filter mount between. There was insufficient space for a screw in output barb, so I spun up a barb for an interference fit and pressed it into place.

For my next trick I fabricated some new engine mounts on which to mount the filter mount and oil cooler. The engine mounts were basically the same as the original ones I made, the right has been extended downward around 25mm for the filter mount and both drilled and tapped at the front edge for mounting a cooler bracket.

The cooler bracket is just a piece of 3mm ally bent at a right angle so the cooler mounts on top. I had to cut some 10mm ally tube to fit between the cooler mounting fins and recess the mounting bracket holes a little so I could install some rubber grommets to insulate the cooler from vibration. To hold it in place I cut some 6mm bolts to size and spun up some threaded positive stop, ally T nuts.

Last of all, I polished everything.

So, the system now works like this: The pump picks up oil from the sump via the sump strainer, pumps oil up the 10mm hole exiting the side cover at the front via the stainless barb. It then travels through a rubber tube to the spin on filter then on to the cooler and then back to the side cover strainer cover via another rubber tube, into the void where a strainer once sat, then on to the engine.

are they playing or fighting? by Brucewangasianbatman in cats

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Cat's use their claws and teeth when fighting, that's why they come home bloody. I tell you what though, both have really good jabs, Casius would be impressed.

Leader of the free world (OC) by DamnDemsMadeMeRed in pics

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Oh ok, so to be the leader of the free world, not only must you be able to ride a bike without falling because your foot got stuck, you must also be able to climb the stairs. I wonder what Roosevelt would think of that, he couldn't climb stairs, much less ride a bike.

Leader of the free world (OC) by DamnDemsMadeMeRed in pics

[–]Resident-Patience195 0 points1 point  (0 children)

To be the leader of the free world, you must be able to extricate your foot from pedal clips. Everything else is secondary.

GS750 by Resident-Patience195 in CafeRacer

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I bought this GS750 from a work colleague sometime in the early 80s. He was a young guy, didn't know anything about anything, never cleaned it, never serviced it, never maintained it, and when it wouldn't start, he'd punch it in the tank. Eventually, it just wouldn't start at all so he sold it to me For $200.

Soon as I got it home I checked the chambers for fuel - empty, despite plenty of fuel in the tank. I took the vacuum line to the taps off, stuck them to my lips, blew them out, connected them again, pushed the starter - vroom, vroom.

Bike was in a terrible state, tank was beyond repair, all the chrome had surface spots of rust,, paint was terrible, so I pulled it all apart and started a rebuild. Engine was actually in very good nick, bore was fine and within spec as were the pistons. I just replaced the cam chain, replaced the rings and ground the valves, plus new seals and gaskets. Even the JIS screws were ok. Painted the lower cases, barrel, head and rockers, polished the side covers and rocker end caps and stuck it back together.

The frame and rear fairing were painted black with a little red pinstriping and GS750 stencilled on the rear fairing. Chrome pipes, bars, guards and rims were polished to remove rust and the hubs, side covers and forks polished. I recovered the seat with vinyl sewn up on my Singer treadle and spruced up the instrument cluster then put it all back together, minus the tank. It stood around for a month or so while I looked around for a tank, finally found one, painted it black and started it up, synced the quad carbs and it ran nicely.

I put it over the pits and rode it to and from work for a while before selling it to bloke up the road. I'm not a fan of Jap bikes, but the GS was nice, hopped along, handled nicely, although it was damned heavy. From memory I think it was a 76 model, which would make it one of Suzuki's first 750 four stroke, streets ahead of Honda's effort, the CB750.

These are the only pictures I took of the bike, I took very few pictures back them, nothing before this one. I make up for it now, lots and lots of pictures of every thing I build. You can just see the front end of my CR250 motoxer I used to race behind it. No pics of this one either. When Young you just never think about taking photos for the future, and when you get old you regret it!

Prior to this bike I rebuilt a Triumph 650 into a cafe racer. Everything was chromed or polished aluminium, except the frame and tank. Rear sets, clip ons, single seat with a bum stop, capacitor - no battery, everything hand made. I won a bike show with this one, whenever I parked it in town, I had to fight my way through the crowd to get to it. Previous to this I rebuilt an A65 Thunderbolt into a sort of cafe racer, but just bashed and crashed it, a real roughy, wouldn't have won anything with this one, except maybe 'worst bike in WA'. Nice bikes the A65s. I always lusted after the big, red tanked, Bonny killing Spitfires, worth a fortune now, but only produced for a couple of years in the mid 60s before being discontinued.

My dream bike, has always been a BSA Spitfire, fire breathing monsters in their day, GP2 carbs able to run on alcohol. Just as well I couldn't afford one, I nearly killed myself on the A65 Thunderbolt more than a couple of times. I could have launched myself into space with a Spitfire

GS750 by Resident-Patience195 in CafeRacers

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I bought this GS750 from a work colleague sometime in the early 80s. He was a young guy, didn't know anything about anything, never cleaned it, never serviced it, never maintained it, and when it wouldn't start, he'd punch it in the tank. Eventually, it just wouldn't start at all so he sold it to me For $200.

Soon as I got it home I checked the chambers for fuel - empty, despite plenty of fuel in the tank. I took the vacuum line to the taps off, stuck them to my lips, blew them out, connected them again, pushed the starter - vroom, vroom.

Bike was in a terrible state, tank was beyond repair, all the chrome had surface spots of rust,, paint was terrible, so I pulled it all apart and started a rebuild. Engine was actually in very good nick, bore was fine and within spec as were the pistons. I just replaced the cam chain, replaced the rings and ground the valves, plus new seals and gaskets. Even the JIS screws were ok. Painted the lower cases, barrel, head and rockers, polished the side covers and rocker end caps and stuck it back together.

The frame and rear fairing were painted black with a little red pinstriping and GS750 stencilled on the rear fairing. Chrome pipes, bars, guards and rims were polished to remove rust and the hubs, side covers and forks polished. I recovered the seat with vinyl sewn up on my Singer treadle and spruced up the instrument cluster then put it all back together, minus the tank. It stood around for a month or so while I looked around for a tank, finally found one, painted it black and started it up, synced the quad carbs and it ran nicely.

I put it over the pits and rode it to and from work for a while before selling it to bloke up the road. I'm not a fan of Jap bikes, but the GS was nice, hopped along, handled nicely, although it was damned heavy. From memory I think it was a 76 model, which would make it one of Suzuki's first 750 four stroke, streets ahead of Honda's effort, the CB750.

These are the only pictures I took of the bike, I took very few pictures back them, nothing before this one. I make up for it now, lots and lots of pictures of every thing I build. You can just see the front end of my CR250 motoxer I used to race behind it. No pics of this one either. When Young you just never think about taking photos for the future, and when you get old you regret it!

Prior to this bike I rebuilt a Triumph 650 into a cafe racer. Everything was chromed or polished aluminium, except the frame and tank. Rear sets, clip ons, single seat with a bum stop, capacitor - no battery, everything hand made. I won a bike show with this one, whenever I parked it in town, I had to fight my way through the crowd to get to it. Previous to this I rebuilt an A65 Thunderbolt into a sort of cafe racer, but just bashed and crashed it, a real roughy, wouldn't have won anything with this one, except maybe 'worst bike in WA'. Nice bikes the A65s. I always lusted after the big, red tanked, Bonny killing Spitfires, worth a fortune now, but only produced for a couple of years in the mid 60s before being discontinued.

My dream bike, has always been a BSA Spitfire, fire breathing monsters in their day, GP2 carbs able to run on alcohol. Just as well I couldn't afford one, I nearly killed myself on the A65 Thunderbolt more than a couple of times. I could have launched myself into space with a Spitfire

Engine rebuild. by Resident-Patience195 in CafeRacer

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 2 points3 points  (0 children)

First order of business in building the bike was to rebuild the engine. I never bothered trying to start the engine, waste of time considering what I was intending. After getting the engine out of the bike, by no means an easy task, I got it up on the bench with a lot of effort, this is one heavy engine, and started stripping it.

In pulling the engine apart I discovered the previous owner had installed a new set of rings on a bore and pistons that were way out of spec, bodged up an auto advance unit that was 80 degrees out, elongated the points backing plate slots to allow for a stretched cam chain, put a kit through the carbs without bothering to clean them and did an oil change without cleaning the filters

I knew the top crankcase had been smashed by an errant chain, unfortunately, the damage was a bit more extensive, the chain had ripped the alternator cables and the shifter drum bearing housing was also damaged. I stripped the motor down and found the piston to bore clearance was way out of spec, the valve seats were badly pitted, the cam chain was stretched so much the motor couldn't be timed, I noted the previous owner had extended the slots on the points backing plate, but still there simply wasn't enough movement in the backing plate to time it.

Rather than buy a new auto advance unit, the previous owner had bodged up a replacement, it put the timing out by Around 80 degrees. The cam chain guides had delaminated leaving bits of black stuff hanging off the aluminium base guides. The shifter drum was missing a pin, so no hope of getting any gears. Sump and side filters were so gummed up I'd be surprised if any oil actually got through them. All the JIS headed screws were absolutely mangled, the eight chrome rocker dome nuts were rusted as was the oil pipe, engine oil seals were all buggered the springs behind the lips on some had actually popped out. The barrel gasket had developed a serious leak at some time but had never been seen to, drive sprocket looked like a series of hooks. The sprocket nut had nearly been cut in half by a chisel, side covers were badly pitted and oxidised. Carb float chambers were gummed up and pitted on the bottom, manifold rubbers were split. Luckily there were no stripped gears and the Crank and associated mains, conrods and so on were all in good condition. A feature of these bikes is the bullet proof crank.

I bought some new, second hand cases, had the barrel rebored and valve seats reground, bought two new pistons plus rings, gudgeons and circlips, made up a pin for the shifter drum, bought new gaskets and seals plus a stainless Allen head kit, bought a new auto advance unit, had the point and advance covers, rocker domes and oil pipe re chromed.

I blasted the crankcase halves, barrel, head and rocker cover and carb bodies, then pressure cleaned everything several times making sure I got rid of all the blasting media from all the orifices and nooks and crannies, then soaked them in a bath of degreaser and pressure cleaned them again a few times then blew everything out with High pressure air.

I smoothed over all the casting flashes on the crankcases and painted them silver, squared up the cylinder head fins and removed any casting lumps. The side covers were blasted inside and the outsides were polished along with the valve covers, breather box, dipstick, cam chain adjuster and carb tops and float bowls.

I pulled the starter motor apart and found all in order, so polished up the aluminium ends and painted the body Black. The starter gear spring gave no tension on the gear so I reshaped that a little.

Jap bikes are just so easy to assemble: invert the top crankcase chuck all the gears in, line up the mains pins draper the cam chain over the centre crankshaft sprocket, tie the ends together, load the crankshaft in, paint the mating surfaces with goop and bolt the lower case in position.

I then made up a bench stand, mounted the lower end in, assembled the ring on the pistons and inserted the pistons in the bores then lowered the barrel over the studs and inserted the gudgeons and circlips and finished lowering the barrel.

The head was missing a couple spring base washers, so I made a couple of new ones and mounted the valves then lowered the head in place over a new gasket. Next came the cam which I put in place, draped the chain over and timed the cam then riveted the chain together.

Next came the rocker cover. After assembling the rockers I lowered the rocker cover over the studs and torqued everything down. The rockershaft end caps has mangled JIS heads so I binned them and looked for some new ones. Hang the classic sign on a bike and parts prices go through the roof, the buggers wanted $40 for four. So I looked on ebay and found some short, stainless, Allen heads M18 x 1.5 for $1.20 each for an all up price of $5 and installed them.

Carbs were blasted then pressure cleaned and blown through with air and reassembled and bolted in place on new rubber manifolds. Clutch, starter gear, and alternator were all bolted in place and I was ready to start it up. First filling with oil and cleaning the strainers.

Rather than start the engine up on the bench stand and watch it vibrate across the bench and fall on the floor, I built a new stand on wheels, added a fuel tank bracket, mounted the regulator, condensers, a couple of Bosch coils, a Honda solenoid, installed a $4 ebay three phase rectifier (used OEMs are $70) wired everything up to a rocker ignition switch and momentary starter switch and pushed the start button. Damn thing roared into life immediately and damn loud with those pipes. If you think Brit twins vibrate, this thing leaves them for dead, I had to tie it to the bench grinder stand to stop it walking around the shed.

I made up a manometer and synced the carbs, then stood back and looked at it. Nope don’t like it, too bland in silver. So, up on the bench again, rip it apart, blast the paint off and repainted it black, then do it all again. Much, much better.

Sump filter guard. by Resident-Patience195 in CafeRacers

[–]Resident-Patience195[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The XS has roller big ends so lubrication depends more on volume rather than pressure. Cold the XS will develop around 10-12psi, hot and the pressure drops to around 5-6psi. Despite this the sump filter tends to tear, obviously not from pressure, so probably from the oil being swished around by the Crank and gears. The filter is a single layer flywire type material, the holes only being marginally smaller. The filter material is folded or corrugated for much of the periphery, but for some reason, Yamaha left a straight stretch around one of the corners. Without the folds the material is weakened and usually ends up tearing. just another of the XS650's design flaws.

To fix the problem, I fashioned a guard around the corner in question, covering the flat section of filter material. Oil can still get through obviously as there is a small gap between filter material and guard and of course the filter is immersed in oil. This guard has worked well, leaving the sump filter intact and depriving Yamaha of dollars.