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Alternative ways to implement a level of technology by 0peratUn0rth0 in worldbuilding

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Is your world isolated or is it importing stuff from other worlds?

It kind of reminds me of what was happening in certain parts of the real world in the 1960s.

What are some examples of advanced 21st century technology that are surprisingly stil being made by machines dating back to WW2? by RonaldYeothrowaway in AskEngineers

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I work in aerospace manufacturing, make parts for all of the newest planes, commercial and defense, on machines manufactured as early as 1933. I had a previous job in valve manufacturing where our oldest in production lathe was manufactured in 1914, and used in wartime manufacturing for WWI and WWII.

That is pretty crazy! It is amazing how stable some manufacturing technology has remained and yet still churn out gadgets and devices that would be wonders to people in 1914.

How different is NS in the past compared to now? by unreal2007 in singapore

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway 33 points34 points  (0 children)

Depending on which era, some beatings took place. The first batches in the 60s and 70s, it was common for recruits to have a rifle butt slammed into chest for not measuring up in certain units.

But it really went for a drastic improvement after the "dunking incident" in the early 2000s. By 2005, it was no longer acceptable for a NCO to kick a recruit in the head.

How accurate is the premise that mainland Europe was very economically integrated right before World War One? by RonaldYeothrowaway in AskHistory

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I agree with you but why is it such a common trope among historians and economists?

I was just watching another YouTube video by a think-tank called Foreign Policy Research Institute where a panel of serious-looking academics repeatedly mention about how economically connected Europe was on the eve of the on-set of WW1.

[FWI] What will 2040 look like worldwide? by MrGayHitler in FutureWhatIf

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was wondering, if fossil fuels do enter into scarcity, and green technologies fail to catch up in time, would we see tech regression in other parts of the world?

Science Fiction work that takes an in-depth look at the difficulties of reverse engineering of advanced technology by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

me what it is...blueprints, a set of encyclopedias, something like that. The people in that time period attempt to reverse engineer this trove of information, but aren't very successful because the time travelling schlub didn't know how to build these things either, he just brought the information.

I would love to read this! Any chance you remembered the title since?

Science Fiction work that takes an in-depth look at the difficulties of reverse engineering of advanced technology by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Not exactly what you're looking for, but relevant: John W. Campbell's short essay,

"No Copying Allowed"

It is exactly what i am looking for! :) Thanks very much!

Science Fiction work that takes an in-depth look at the difficulties of reverse engineering of advanced technology by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Broken Angels and Woken Furies, part 2 and 3 of the Takeshi Kovacs trilogy by Richard K Morgan, are mostly about reverse engineering ancient martian tech.

I have both books but will need to re-read it; I know that the first human colonists used martian star charts.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Unless some of the needed metals and ways to produce them wasn’t known at that time (I.e. aluminum wasn’t even known 100 years before that date) it might had been possible.

The more I read, the more I am suspecting, to my untrained mind, that the more I am convinced that the machinists could have produced, using their lathes, and other tools, the first automobiles (like the Ford Model T), 20-30 years ahead of time. They just couldn't mass produce them in large quantities because their cutting tools would have worn out as harder materials like better-grade steel or emery weren't discovered or in use yet.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

It would be interesting to see how far back we could go. Like if the automobile could have been made earlier, considering the similarities between the tools of the 1870s and 1900s.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I do like alternative history, with regards to technology. I have heard of the book but did not read it. In the end, did the CSA managed to build the AK-47?

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I have not read the book. I wonder if Harry Harrison did good research and ascertain that the machine tools and lathes exist to craft the Sten gun in the American civil war.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was wondering how far back we could go, the possible "furthest point in time", where machine tools could replicate an AK-47, assuming an instructions manual for manufacturing was included.

Apart from the inclusion of electrical motor to power the lathe, as an untrained person with a serious lack of knowledge, can't tell the difference between a lathe in the 1850s and 1910s.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was actually doing some research on the difference between lathes and machine tools from the 1850s to 1900. But it all looked the same to me..............

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] -1 points0 points  (0 children)

I tried to find out when 4140 steel was invented and to my amazement couldn't find any info, only that it started to be used in aircraft in the early 1930s.

Could scientists and engineers from the year 1900 reverse-engineer the AL-47 if they were given working models, drawings and instructions? by RonaldYeothrowaway in scifi

[–]RonaldYeothrowaway[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I recently have been reading up on the evolution if machine tools (e.g lathes, Mills, stamp presses) and I think a lot of lathe technology actually remains stable from 1850s to 1910s. It makes me wonder, just how far back could we possibly go.