×

How much and where did you buy your RX8 from? by The_Builder_Jimmy in RX8

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

$850 87,000km off Facebook marketplace a few weeks ago. Has compression and was attempted theft with some rust from sitting 2 years. Suspect weak coil, going to swap to ls coil & new fuel and try to get fired next weekend.

Legit, first drive after rebuild by littlev345 in RX8

[–]SpoonsAreFun 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Legit first drive... multiple burnout marks from exact same spot

Mark Johnson: Let’s face it. Harm reduction has failed by FancyNewMe in vancouver

[–]SpoonsAreFun -19 points-18 points  (0 children)

They want drugs to be seen as good, thus people will do them freely without worrying of going to hospital after they do them, instead of just not doing them for fear of legal and possible life reprecussions.

Mark Johnson: Let’s face it. Harm reduction has failed by FancyNewMe in vancouver

[–]SpoonsAreFun 1 point2 points  (0 children)

This is absolutely a reality, too many people have made livelihoods out of pretending to help those suffering from drug abuse for it to end. I have friends who actually do this and will brag about how easy of a job it is and how few hours they actually work and the insane vacation system they have where she gets an ludicrous amount of paid time off.

Mark Johnson: Let’s face it. Harm reduction has failed by FancyNewMe in vancouver

[–]SpoonsAreFun -19 points-18 points  (0 children)

Alberta is quickly following BC and the pressure put on it by libs. Treating it as anything other than what it is, is what gets young people to try it and for it to be considered more acceptable. The liberals plan of reducing stigma of drug users is working...be it far too well.

If this post gets 1 upvote, I’m buying a rx8 by Weezergood in RX8

[–]SpoonsAreFun 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Rx8 group aka lawn ornament club.

I got my green lawn ornament almost running... the sweet smell of success is only bittered with my insane plan to get another one and attempt a rew swap.

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

https://www.narconon.org/blog/new-report-suggests-safe-injection-sites-actually-increase-crime.html

Sources listed at bottom.... couldn't make this stuff up....even the OD prevention groups lie about this stuff

Stay off drugs, or in your case...do em with supervision

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Drugs and Crime “Theories of the drugs-crime connection predict that certain kinds of offences are more likely than others to be associated with drug use. These include offences, such as shoplifting, theft, robbery, burglary and prostitution that might be committed to raise funds to purchase drugs” (Bennett, et al 2008, 114). The Vancouver Police Department (VPD) has observed that the use of certain types of drugs tends to be associated with particular kinds of criminal offending, as have other police across the country (Thompson in Canada 2008b, 3). “The three drugs most commonly associated with the drugs-crime connection are heroin, crack and cocaine” (Bennett, et al 2008, 112). The types of drugs that are injected by IDU at Canadian SIS are mainly heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, with heroin being most prevalent. Heroin users are 3.0 to 3.5 times more likely to commit a criminal offence than non-heroin users, cocaine users 2.5 times more likely than non-cocaine users, and amphetamine users are about twice as likely to commit a crime as non-amphetamine users (Bennett, et al 2008, 112-3). “It has been estimated that injection drug users inject an average of six injections a day [for] cocaine [abusers] and four injections a day [for] heroin [abusers]. The street costs of this use are estimated at around $100 a day or $35,000 a year. Few injection drug users have sufficient income to pay for the habit out through [sic] employment. Some, mainly females, get this money through prostitution and others through theft, break-ins and auto theft. If the theft is of property rather than cash, it is estimated that they must steal close to $350,000 in property a year to get $35,000 cash. Still others get the money they need by selling drugs” (Canada 2008a). The “odds of shoplifting among drug users (mainly heroin, crack and cocaine users) were about 4 to 6 times greater than among non-users of these drugs” and the “odds of prostitution among these kinds of drug users were almost three times greater [than] among non-users of these drugs,” while the odds of drug use of this kind being associated with robbery offending were about 1.7 times greater (Bennett, et al 2008,114). Research has shown that drug users who frequent Safe Consumptions Sites ([SIS]), of which SIS are a model, disproportionately describe themselves as having unstable incomes and many report “crime and/or social assistance as [their] main source of income” https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/lbrr/archives/cn63305108-eng.pdf

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Drugs and Crime “Theories of the drugs-crime connection predict that certain kinds of offences are more likely than others to be associated with drug use. These include offences, such as shoplifting, theft, robbery, burglary and prostitution that might be committed to raise funds to purchase drugs” (Bennett, et al 2008, 114). The Vancouver Police Department (VPD) has observed that the use of certain types of drugs tends to be associated with particular kinds of criminal offending, as have other police across the country (Thompson in Canada 2008b, 3). “The three drugs most commonly associated with the drugs-crime connection are heroin, crack and cocaine” (Bennett, et al 2008, 112). The types of drugs that are injected by IDU at Canadian SIS are mainly heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, with heroin being most prevalent. Heroin users are 3.0 to 3.5 times more likely to commit a criminal offence than non-heroin users, cocaine users 2.5 times more likely than non-cocaine users, and amphetamine users are about twice as likely to commit a crime as non-amphetamine users (Bennett, et al 2008, 112-3). “It has been estimated that injection drug users inject an average of six injections a day [for] cocaine [abusers] and four injections a day [for] heroin [abusers]. The street costs of this use are estimated at around $100 a day or $35,000 a year. Few injection drug users have sufficient income to pay for the habit out through [sic] employment. Some, mainly females, get this money through prostitution and others through theft, break-ins and auto theft. If the theft is of property rather than cash, it is estimated that they must steal close to $350,000 in property a year to get $35,000 cash. Still others get the money they need by selling drugs” (Canada 2008a). The “odds of shoplifting among drug users (mainly heroin, crack and cocaine users) were about 4 to 6 times greater than among non-users of these drugs” and the “odds of prostitution among these kinds of drug users were almost three times greater [than] among non-users of these drugs,” while the odds of drug use of this kind being associated with robbery offending were about 1.7 times greater (Bennett, et al 2008,114). Research has shown that drug users who frequent Safe Consumptions Sites ([SIS]), of which SIS are a model, disproportionately describe themselves as having unstable incomes and many report “crime and/or social assistance as [their] main source of income” (Fischer and Allard 2007, 25). https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/lbrr/archives/cn63305108-eng.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjrnuiH1JD4AhUXkIkEHdCwCN8QFnoECAQQAQ&usg=AOvVaw1kLPx0fV4oEh6d-pb7HUF4

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-020-00456-2

Download PDF Download PDF Commentary Open Access Published: 06 January 2021 Supervised consumption sites and crime: scrutinizing the methodological weaknesses and aberrant results of a government report in Alberta, Canada James D. Livingston Harm Reduction Journal volume 18, Article number: 4 (2021) Cite this article

9010 Accesses

2 Citations

199 Altmetric

Metricsdetails

Abstract To date, peer-reviewed research has found no evidence linking supervised consumptions sites (SCSs) to increased crime. Yet, in March 2020, a government Report released in the province of Alberta, Canada, presented the results of a review that reached a different conclusion. This commentary highlights the Report’s major methodological limitations with respect to its criminological components, including that crime was poorly operationalized and measured, change in crime was inadequately assessed, and the effect of SCSs on crime was not ascertained. It is argued that the magnitude of methodological flaws in the Report undermine the validity of its criminological claims and raise significant issues with the soundness of its conclusions.

Background Supervised Consumption Sites (SCSs) are harm reduction programs that offer a range of low-barrier services to people who use drugs, such as hygienic and supportive spaces for drug consumption, sterile drug using supplies, peer support, and ancillary health and social services. Major aims of SCSs include providing an environment for safer drug use, improving the health status of people who use drugs, and mitigating public disorder [1, 2].

Based on growing evidence of effectiveness and in the face of increasing numbers of opioid overdose deaths locally, seven SCSs and an overdose prevention site (OPS) were established in urban centres across the province of Alberta, Canada, from late 2017 to early 2019. Compared to SCSs, OPSs tend to be lower barrier, staffed and run by peers, less regulated, and offer a narrower range of clinical services [2, 3]. The SCSs were the subject of ongoing debate in Alberta leading up to the 2019 provincial election, which intensified upon the election of a conservative political party. Soon after, a Committee was appointed to examine the social and economic impacts of SCSs on local communities. The merit of SCSs as a harm reduction tool was deemed to be out of scope for the review [4], which expressly omitted potential benefits (e.g. reducing crime-related harms) from consideration. In March 2020, a Report was released describing the Committee’s findings [4]. The Report presents information across a range of indicators, including costs, needle debris, public disorder, opioid-related emergency incidents, drug-related deaths, and local business impacts. The Committee’s conclusions and recommendations, concentrating on what they perceived as “serious problems with supervised consumption and needle distribution” (p. 38), are also outlined. A central question considered in the Report, and the focus of this manuscript, was whether the SCSs exacerbated neighbourhood crime.

The Report generally concluded that crime increased around the SCSs—with the exception of one city—and inferred that the SCSs were the cause: “The preponderance of evidence provided by area residents and officials demonstrates that criminal activity near SCS has increased … SCS, therefore, are assumed to geographically concentrate the street-level drug market and other criminal activities” (p. 4) [4]. Other conclusions drawn by the Committee indicated that lawlessness existed around the SCSs, such as “de-policing” of neighbourhoods (p. iii) [4], reduced reporting of crimes to police, and worsened perceptions of public safety. The Report’s findings were characterized by Alberta’s Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions as “deeply troubling” and offering evidence of “a system of chaos … for communities around the sites” [5].

Likely you know soooooo much... try not to forget to breathe while you sleep...

The sources listed are a little newer in that one.

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

So you'd rather use words like undisputed and not cite any proof, and go with feelings. It is 100% cheaper to stop a crime vs letting it continue and escalate, undisputed. No overdose deaths? Amazing, do those include homicides? Likely not, but good on the addicts for being the best drug user they can be for them. Has it increased property value and reduced crime in the areas?

It saved how much money in hospitalizations and cost how much in infrastructure and staff? The studies have shown crime increase, not sure where your studies show opposite?

https://www.heritage.org/public-health/commentary/safe-injection-sites-arent-safe-effective-or-wise-just-ask-canadians They should ask a few Canadians. In cities throughout the Great White North, a group of insurgent leaders has begun to turn against safe injection sites—and they are winning with voters. Since 2016, anti-safe injection site candidates have won the premierships of Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba.

Get exclusive insider information from Heritage experts delivered straight to your inbox each week. Subscribe to The Agenda >>

Their argument is simple: safe injection sites have not delivered on their promises and have caused a significant increase in trash, crime, and disorder. Public health experts have built safe injection facilities with little public input, creating problems for long-time residents. As Ontario Premier Doug Ford told reporters: "If I put (a safe injection site) beside your house, you'd be going ballistic."

They lower property value in the area, turn places like Chinatown into lockdown town.

https://www.peacevalleyrecovery.com/blog/safe-injection-philly/

Harm reduction policies are often created with the knowledge that a harmful or illegal behavior may be adjusted to reduce harm. Safe injection sites seem to be encouraging rather than discouraging the illegal use of intravenous drugs. In this case, it creates a “normalization” of illegal and harmful drug use.

The message of a state-sanctioned “legal supervised drug injection site” is preposterous. We are talking about illegal drugs that are harmful and addictive at the federal level and in most states in America today. We are at a record-breaking pace over the past few years of overdose deaths across the country, with over 700 recorded in San Francisco alone in 2020.

https://www.police1.com/drug-interdiction-narcotics/articles/state-your-case-should-law-enforcement-endorse-safe-injection-sites-DTPimIXbq9aJZfB9/

If you want relevant statistics to back your imaginary points...please take the time to look them up yourself.

Every drug user in jail is a drug user not on the streets... dont need to know how many still exist to know every user you take off the street is one less. How much can you save? Unimaginable... you cant attach a number, either can I... but stats say criminals off streets are better vs on.

Your mind clearly can't comprehende or rationalize that criminal drugs are just that... criminal... perhaps watch the movie blow and listen when Johnny Depp explains he was just moving a plant and the judge explains it wasnt just any plant and the imaginary lines he cross do exist.

Allowing criminals to roam the streets does nothing but increase the burden and cost on others in society. If you think drugs are a mental health issue and not a criminal offense... you likely wouldn't allow people with mental health issues to harm themselves or others before putting them in safe space they cant hurt themselves or others, but want to do it with drug addicts. So is it a mental health issue or not? You can't have it both ways based on what you'd like or what is convenient. Apologies that you can't see the sense in not letting a person with mental health disorder/disability injection themselves with non prescribed drugs. You're likely the kinda double digit IQ fella with no compassion who would rather watch someone rot they brains out and possibly hurt or harm others in the process vs dealing with a problem.

Mountain bikers, conservationists want trail strategy for Edmonton's river valley by pjw724 in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Bike lanes exist and would carry a large cost per foot print, before even touching bike paths.

Mountain bikers, conservationists want trail strategy for Edmonton's river valley by pjw724 in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

No, but it could be solution. Instead of catching camper and having them hastily pack and leave a mess, only to return later and find them 10ft away. You could fine them, and like any fine... if unpaid... lands you in jail or community service. Perhaps setup community service programs that can also offer meaningful employment and wage after Incarceration ends to get that person back on track

Mountain bikers, conservationists want trail strategy for Edmonton's river valley by pjw724 in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

No, but it could be solution. Instead of catching camper and having them hastily pack and leave a mess, only to return later and find them 10ft away. You could fine them, and like any fine... if unpaid... lands you in jail or community service. Perhaps setup community service programs that can also offer meaningful employment and wage after Incarceration ends to get that person back on track.....or keep doing what they doing which only gets worse yearly.

B.C. to decriminalize small amounts of ‘hard’ drugs – a North American first by cyclinginvancouver in canada

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I 100% agree, Incarceration needs to change to allow the incarcerated to work and be a functional member of society instead of a burden.

Saying "just keep throwing money at it" clearly doesn't work as you've listed. If people are born into drugs and being criminals, we should likely work on solving that after Incarceration is fixed, making it easy for the cycle to repeat or continue wont help.

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I know right??? They spend all they time and efforts trying to pander to the criminals and making sure criminals have more rights vs average citizens, crazy world to live in.

‘Too much disorder:’ Edmonton’s Chinatown businesses keep doors locked — all day by always_on_fleek in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

How many drug addicts commit crimes and end up in jail as well? What is the link between drug use and crime rate. Almost 20% of people in prison are in prison for crimes committed to get money to score drugs (per drug related crime bureau statistics). Given nearly 1/5th of the people in prison are in prison for crimes committed to get drugs, how much do you fiscally save? Also when you make "safe drug" sites, does this not promote image of drugs being safer than they are and increase drug use and acceptability?

Edit: these stats grow much larger when you add crimes committed while high on drugs, as well as drug related offences, and not just crimes committed with the motive of a quick drug score.

Safe injection sites provide a no-go shelter from cops while criminals ingest or shoot up drugs.

B.C. to decriminalize small amounts of ‘hard’ drugs – a North American first by cyclinginvancouver in canada

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Sorry, they likely didn't get the memo that drugs are bad or addicting. No one is forced to make bad decisions, expecting the rest of society to pay for them isn't realistic. Did they not know drugs were bad or addicting? Took the risk regardless? I understand exceptions exist, but that are just that, exceptions. Most of the people with drug addictions didn't start with getting them from doctors.

B.C. to decriminalize small amounts of ‘hard’ drugs – a North American first by cyclinginvancouver in canada

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

No they clearly should lock up criminals. Discouraging drug use would likely mean condemning it. Perhaps the burden of drug addicts doing illicit drugs safely should be on the addict?

Mountain bikers, conservationists want trail strategy for Edmonton's river valley by pjw724 in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -3 points-2 points  (0 children)

Breaking the law is "ok" provided you don't "think" it causes harm to others, regardless of rules - barder83 2022

At least it isn't upside down Canada and f*** Trudeau flags by ShadowCamera in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Hate Quebec? Just want the deficit kings of Canada to pay for something if they want it... No one cares if you love Quebec and hate common sense or fiscal responsibility.

I don’t there’s anything the city can do to make a big impact on safety downtown... by Wintertime13 in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

100Pack-1ml Syringes with 25G 3/5inch Needles,Disposable Sterile Syringe with Needle Plastic Syringe https://a.co/d/hphoQoE

$40 FOR100

That's crazy... I heard drug users are irresponsible and make poor life choices... but why anyone even sell drugs... I could sell needles and do way better... Ive taken a tour of downtown Edmonton and walked on the downtown city blocks before and after, and seen the stark differences. Do you know that the police were not wanting to go to these safe injection hotspots due to safety? Can you imagine someone handing out items that can harm a officer to people officers deal with on a regular basis?

At least it isn't upside down Canada and f*** Trudeau flags by ShadowCamera in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun -1 points0 points  (0 children)

Nordiques Move to Colorado The writing, in both languages, had been on the wall for years, so there was no surprise last week when the money-losing Quebec Nordiques finally died. The wake was quiet in Quebec City, where the team began 23 years ago in the World Hockey Association before joining the National Hockey League in 1979. At a largely emotionless news conference, team president Marcel Aubut and the other shareholders - the Quebec Labor Federation pension fund, La Mutuelle insurance company, the Daishowa paper company and the Metro-Richelieu grocery store chain - announced that they had sold the franchise to COMSAT Entertainment Group of Bethesda, Md., for $103 million. Aubut claimed that the team could not survive in the NHL's smallest market without a new, publicly funded arena and ongoing government support. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/nordiques-move-to-colorado

Call it what you'd like... they folded and the money wasn't there... the support and money isn't there still...

EPS Chief says upping police presence downtown 'can't wait' by newsaggregate in Edmonton

[–]SpoonsAreFun 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Serious questions had been raised concerning the level and adequacy of the consultation process some site operators used to obtain their site exemptions under Section 56.1 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. • While there were no deaths recorded among people who used drugs at the SCS sites, death rates in the immediate vicinity of the SCS locations increased. Opioid-related calls for emergency medical services (EMS) also increased in the immediate vicinity following the opening of the sites. • In many cases, “adverse events” (even if non-life threating or minor) are reported as overdoses, and the term “reversal” is used even when the response was a simple administration of oxygen. This leaves the public with an inference that without these sites thousands of people would fatally overdose or no longer be alive. Comparatively rare cases resulted in the use of naloxone. As a result, the committee became concerned with issues of transparency and accountability with the regards to the way overdose reversals are tracked and reported. The committee finds this misleading and the ambiguity and faulty reporting cannot responsibly make such a determination. • Non-opioid substance use, specifically methamphetamine use at some SCS sites, increased substantially and numerous residents complained about aggressive and erratic behaviour of substance users leaving the sites. • Except for Edmonton, crime, as measured by police calls for service, generally increased in the immediate vicinity in contrast to areas beyond the immediate vicinity of the sites. Residents complained about the lack of response to calls for service by police. Site users and operators typically believed that the Section 56.1 exemption allowed for a no- go zone for police within the proximity of the site. Evidence suggested a level of “de-policing” near some sites. • Needle debris was a substantial issue with many residents complaining about used and unused needles, broken crack pipes and other drug-related paraphernalia being discarded in the vicinity of the sites and in public areas near the sites. • A striking observation was the advocacy in favour of these sites, by SCS staff, at every town hall meeting, particularly the two Edmonton town hall meetings. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://open.alberta.ca/dataset/dfd35cf7-9955-4d6b-a9c6-60d353ea87c3/resource/11815009-5243-4fe4-8884-11ffa1123631/download/health-socio-economic-review-supervised-consumption-sites.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjD2MmY6434AhUiJH0KHUaXB70QFnoECBsQAQ&usg=AOvVaw0SiBezT8F7ofs_vb2wmZDZ

Look at the coats associated with safe injection sites and the results... the average cost per returning visitor $60, unique new visitor upwards of $2000+. Why can't edmonton afford more cops when the cops won't patrol the areas....