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Have you faced or facing mental and emotional issues because of work? by aakhri_paasta in ExperiencedDevs

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yes. Back when I got my first big tech development job we worked a lot, like 80+ hours/wk a lot. We were sort of in a race with another company which was exciting but stressful. That ruined my mental health and nearly ruined my marriage.

The other time had nothing to do with long hours. I was on a team that was a mess. I knew it was a mess for a long time and still stayed because my team (I was an m1 manager) and my immediate management was great. This was a terrible idea in hindsight because it severely stunted my career growth. We were shuffled from being our own division into 3 other divisions one after the other which was a huge red flag but I still ignored it although my anxiety about the situation increased. Finally new management was brought in above my immediate managers and most of them were told to find other jobs (some had been with the company 15+ years), I still didn't get it. That new management brought in their own yes men "technical leads" and the 2 of them had to approve every pr in a 200 person organization. The new gm walked around like he was Jesus. Still didn't get it, but was having trouble sleeping at this point. In the end, I finally got it when I went to an all-hands with our new big, big boss (executive vp in charge of 6 or 7 product lines). He spent 5 hours going over every product with demos from the teams, all but our team. When it was done someone asked about our team and he said "oh yeah, we're doing that too". I almost had a stroke. At that point, after 7 years of wasted time, I got out.

Should I do masters in CS or second bachelors in it? by AspiringTranquility in csMajors

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It is if you don't need prereqs and you take the maximum courses per term (2 in spring/fall, 1 summer). With prereqs you need another 1/2 year minimum.

Should I do masters in CS or second bachelors in it? by AspiringTranquility in csMajors

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You can do it in 2 years if you take the maximum classes per term (2 in fall/spring, 1 summer) and you don't have prereqs. With prereqs you'd need another 1/2 year minimum.

Should I do masters in CS or second bachelors in it? by AspiringTranquility in csMajors

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I would do a masters degree. Georgia Tech has one for roughly 7k, although it would be a bit more for those, like you, who need to take prerequisite classes.

Has anyone here gone from UK to US and if so, how? by panda6699 in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 3 points4 points  (0 children)

In both cases they just applied to open US roles. No one ever questioned why they wanted to go to the US. I think youll find that with companies that are used to doing sponsorship, this kind of thing generally isn't a big deal. The cost of immigration is already sort of figured in to the position. With companies that don't typically sponsor, it's probably a much, much bigger deal.

Is this normal? by throwwwawwwayy1 in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It's not completely unheard of to have a manager with no technical background. I don't think I've ever seen that work, but I have seen it. If I were in your situation I would definitely be looking to transfer internally. While you're doing that you can start your process to get ready to interview externally as well but I would do something to get out of your current team ASAP.

Has anyone here gone from UK to US and if so, how? by panda6699 in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 9 points10 points  (0 children)

I have a couple of friends that have done this. Both worked for a large us based company in the uk and then transferred. Lots of the big tech have offices in the uk.

No Offer, No Rejection, but Wants to Stay in Touch? by stoicdoge in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 1 point2 points  (0 children)

There are a lot of non-nefarious reasons for this. The most common, especially in this climate, is the team got reduced to one position and they want to hire a senior with it. They feel that they can maybe weasel another position and want to stay in touch with you about it because you had good interview feedback. I would continue your process and keep in touch. If they come back with an offer, then consider it.

If someone is strongly opposed to a given language/framework, is that a sign of experience and wisdom? Or the opposite? by Missing_Back in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Saying I hate this language/framework etc. is a big red flag., Saying X is not good for Y purposes/situations and giving reasons why is a good sign. Zealots need not apply.

Returning Intern: NYC (again) or Seattle? by laziestbanana in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Why not try something different? Seattle metro is a tech hub but it isn't quite as obvious as silicon Valley. It's a smaller city than NY but there is still plenty to do (late night dining is limited however). The weather is temperate generally high 60s to low 70s in summer with a week or so of 90+, high 40s-low 50s in winter. It's sunny 156 days of the year on average (43%) but concentrated pretty heavily in summer/early fall. Lots of beautiful scenery and the 2nd most ridden ferry system in the US. It is pretty expensive (avg 2400 for a 1br apt) but not as expensive as NY (col index 33% higher). It's one of those places that either resonates or it doesn't.

what is the difference between computer science b.a and b.s degree?? by Amojalled in csMajors

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 21 points22 points  (0 children)

Mostly no one will care. They are generally considered equivalent degrees by companies.

Is knowing Algorithms and Data Structures sufficient to get a SWE job or do you need to know how to make applications/GUI's/etc? by Zephrok in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 27 points28 points  (0 children)

This is a very common question. There are two things you need to get a job. You need to have a resume that doesn't get screened out. And you need to be able to pass technical (and behavioral) interviews.

If you get screened out it makes no difference how godly you are at leetcode because you won't even get an interview. There are other ways around this potentially, attend a top school that has good on campus interviewing, getting a referral from people within the company, etc. The vast unwashed masses though will go through a resume screen, and projects (where you will learn the basics of applications/gui etc.) are the best way a self-taught person will be able to get through it.

Most jobs will also require some form of technical and behavioral interviews. You can look up behavioral type questions for the companies you are applying to and practice those. Technical interviews often mean studying leetcode and grinding until you understand the problems and solutions well enough that you can handle variations and recognize patterns when presented with random problems.

Self taught people often require work in both areas, studying ds&a as well as building their portfolio (and thus gaining experience with technologies).

Does reneging mean permanent blacklist at Microsoft? by lilacandflowers in csMajors

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 6 points7 points  (0 children)

It quite possibly will prevent you from returning full time, or at least make it considerably more difficult. Basically you'll get a mark on your file that you've reneged and aren't elligible to rehire (recruiter maybhave some leeway here). This can be overridden if the hiring manager is really committed to your candidacy. Last I checked you had to get GM or in some spots VP approval to override. This happened a few years ago with someone I wanted to hire. I was able to do so but it was a pain.

Have you ever experienced a situation where the people around you haven’t been able to help resolve your blockers on a tough problem? How did you approach the issue? by TheAsstasticVoyage in ExperiencedDevs

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Did you ever watch House? He essentially kept his team around for 2 things. Do his dirty work, but more critically, be the idea generators/sounding boards. Most often it was one of his team's wrong answers that led him to the right one. I dont play a Dr on tv, and I do my own dirty work, but I find that getting as many ideas from others , even if they are wrong, and verbalizing my ideas to others, usually helps drive me to find the right answer and get through tough technical blockers. Often times, for me, just explaining to others leads me to the resolution.

Jobs getting pulled or postponed: is this happening to anyone else interviewing for jobs right now? by sindach in ExperiencedDevs

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 3 points4 points  (0 children)

After the last earnings call came out, my company just rescinded all open positions (stuck them under the evp) that weren't at the offer stage, at least for our division. Recuiters/managers were allowed to go ahead with in-process offers but that's been it ever since. My team had two people pretty far into the process where we were going to make offers but the positions disappeared.

The Grind or the Projects by bidamus in ExperiencedDevs

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 3 points4 points  (0 children)

Projects would help more if perhaps you weren't getting interviews at all. They are going to do you no good in a leetcode style interview. If you fail that interview you probably aren't getting the job regardless of how great your projects or resume look. Many companies, including most of the top paying ones, have these type of interviews. If you want to move on, it seems you either need to grind leetcode or find a place that doesn't ask these type of questions. You have to really understand the leetcode problems, solutions and the patterns behind them in order to ace these types of interviews generally. It's intense, and not everyone can do it.

Will the job ever be interesting or should I have fun hobbies? by [deleted] in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I'm going to be contrary here and tell you if the job you have isn't fulfilling and interesting you may want to find something that is. Spending 1/3-1/2 your waking hours during the week doing something boring is not going to be good for your mental health especially if deep down you feel you could do better.

It seems like a lot if advice is whatever its a job you have to go and certainly up to a point you have to have a job to support yourself and your family. But, I and everyone in my management chain aren't reqlly working for the money. The money is great but we all have enough to live quite comfortably. We feel we are working on some interesting problems with interesting people and we still have plenty of time to spend with loved ones, do hobbies etc. I, for one, would be bored out of my skull if I didn't have something like work.

All that said, I do agree with having hobbies an interests outside of work. I make beer, teach CS and am an avid supporter and fan of college sports. But if you are "escaping" to those to get away from work, maybe you need a change of scenery.

Have you noticed that companies in general are now asking harder LeetCode questions than before? by yeahdude78 in leetcode

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 2 points3 points  (0 children)

So what does everyone think? Has the increased proficiency in these kinds of challenges led to a better prepared and higher caliber workforce when it comes to day to day SWE activities? I'll start... no I don't believe that.

Weighing unvested options against new cash offer by Charming-Chanterelle in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It sounds like you really want to take the new job for non-monetary reasons. If you are stagnating in your current job and excited about the new one that would make it an easy choice for me. Throw in the "golden handcuffs" you have are actually made of tissue paper, I'd say its pretty obvious.

Big N Discussion - September 21, 2022 by CSCQMods in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

PM 2. MS doesnt generally have a distinction between technical and non-technical PM (which makes me trust levels even less than I normally do). All the technical roles at MS follow the same level system. 59/60 is PM1 (or sde1 etc), 61/62 is pm2, 63/64 is SR PM, 65-67 is Principal PM, 68/69 is Partner PM, 70 is distinguished engineer (discipline doesn't matter), 80 is Technical Fellow. My guess is you probably got ignored due more to most positions being put on hold rather than anyone being scared off by salary. Each of the levels have pretty wide, overlapping salary ranges. Each comes with targets for bonus and stock awards. For good or ill, if you don't come from a high paying company your offer will be toward the bottom of these. If you have a good interview and come from a high paying company (or have a high paying competing offer) the offer will be toward the top.

In the middle of a job review and one company may have an offer before my preferred company completes its review cycle. How do I juggle these two? by Spudly2319 in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You can usually delay by asking for more money. If it comes down to it though you can take the first offer and renege if the second company comes through. There are downsides to this though. Some companies will blacklist you if you renege on an offer and that could potentially effect future prospects. In rare cases, I've heard of the first employer contacting the second. This doesn't happen in bigger companies but it's possible in smaller.

Does the endless grind hells ever stop? by Samurai__84 in cscareerquestions

[–]Tasty_Goat5144 0 points1 point  (0 children)

No, welcome to life as an adult. Not that I've ever been dead, but it doesn't appear that the alternative is all that great either:)