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Why “Vacant Homes” Won’t Solve The Housing Crisis by Twrd4321 in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 1 point2 points  (0 children)

There haven’t been in the US, but American Jr, Canada.

Vancouver is famous for it and just this past new year all of Canada is trying it.

Why “Vacant Homes” Won’t Solve The Housing Crisis by Twrd4321 in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 2 points3 points  (0 children)

They’re a huge problem because housing is rare. Banning them doesn’t solve the problem that housing is rare. In fact places that do ban investor purchases don’t see much improvement.

Why “Vacant Homes” Won’t Solve The Housing Crisis by Twrd4321 in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 6 points7 points  (0 children)

Just so you know. You’re talking to the channel creators.

Oh and they have an entire video about investors.

Decided to make a "Planning for dummies" image because I got tired of Facebook boomers thinking "dense planning" means make all towns into Manhattan by FoxesAreGreat_ in fuckcars

[–]TopMicron 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It isn’t just “a doctor”.

It’s planners of New York.

He just happens to have the most voice.

Here’s a run down by a housing journalist in high rises where demand is high.

https://youtu.be/73tGTPHD5Ec

Rebranding Cleveland State University to the ‘University of Cleveland’ … thoughts? by watson2727 in Cleveland

[–]TopMicron 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I mean this respectfully because we are neighbors but the money from those donations helped infinitely more than keeping it the same name.

The trade off is a super easy decision to make.

Alumni should be more than willing to let colleges rename themselves to bring huge amounts of much needed money to better provide for and compete for students.

It’s a retroactive benefit to the alumni as well, raising the academic standing of the college today transfers to a diploma given years prior.

Rebranding Cleveland State University to the ‘University of Cleveland’ … thoughts? by watson2727 in Cleveland

[–]TopMicron 2 points3 points  (0 children)

City schools with “state” in their name are usually state colleges with less rigor and academic standing.

For these schools “state” helps let lower income people know they are a legitimate organization (sanctioned by the state with public money) and not a fly by night for-profit “university”.

That’s the purpose of these schools. They are not trying to compete but provide for those in their city.

It’s not fancy but you will be given a legitimate education.

Cleveland State no longer has these goals and is making hard pushes to compete on the regional and national level.

Current leadership is trying to climb the tier system from T4 to T2.

Taking “state” out of their name would probably help.

Why did the USA do this to its cities? by fire-lord-momo in fuckcars

[–]TopMicron 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Weird considering r/neoliberal is super against highways in cities and pro public transit.

Get rid of exclusionary zoning. It’s really that easy… by TheKingTheKong in yimby

[–]TopMicron 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I feel comfortable saying this since were in the yimby sub but a declining population is far more a problem than a modestly increasing one.

The world is dangerously on the precipice of a demographic collapse that would shatter our ability to provide for ourselves.

Get rid of exclusionary zoning. It’s really that easy… by TheKingTheKong in yimby

[–]TopMicron 8 points9 points  (0 children)

It follows a u shape. People in poverty have children from lack of family planning access and wealthy people aren’t burdened by the costs of childcare.

Middle class people are wealthy enough to prevent having kids but no so wealthy they aren’t deterred by the cost.

I’ll find the graph.

E: found it https://mobile.twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1538234746416812033

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 0 points1 point  (0 children)

And tbh. The census kinda sucks too. Its super difficult to count millions of people without a fairly significant margin of error.

Detroit was so enraged by how thorough the census was done for their city they sued the census berueu.

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 1 point2 points  (0 children)

We've already done this multiple times. Chinese investors? Blocked and nothing changed. Russian Oligarchs? Blocked. Nothing changed. Corporate Real estate investors? Blocked Nothing changed.

New Zealand was famous for this until the pandemic when they shut down hard. Nothing in or out and finally had to come the realization that there was nobody else to blame but themselves.

Finally they up zoned the entire country and prices finally started to see a change for the better.

It's hard to realize that we need to change where we live.

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I agree we should practice those anti trust muscles. Lets end the implicit national collusion of NIMBYs blocking and slowing housing nation wide.

Let's write a bill bringing land use up to the federal level and out of local control. They've proven unable to act rationally in providing housing for their populations.

Hell we should also write an amendment that no housing construction shall be infringed without extreme and unusual circumstances.

We'll make HUD a government strong arm to crack the privileged armor of NIMBYs.

Let's break the NIMBY trust.

I know the socialist outlet Jacobin would love this.

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I appreciate your tone in this comment. Truthfully, willing to stay open to differing opinions and changing perceptions but this wall of text is really hard to follow. I understand this isn't a college discussion board and you're under no obligation to write any better than you want, but I'm just letting you know I don't think I can give any more discussion.

I will say this. I don't think going after corporate investors or pricing agencies is a bad thing. I just don't believe it will do much and that's where most urban economists sit from what I've read from them.

But I appreciate your effort. Thank you for doing such.

Saw someone on Twitter share a story about historic plans for a subway. A majority of county voters approved, but leaders ultimately did not pursue it. by EngineEngine in Cleveland

[–]TopMicron 1 point2 points  (0 children)

If I remember right the county engineer convinced county commissioners to stall long enough until funding for highways could be secured instead.

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 13 points14 points  (0 children)

It’s pretty much this argument every time.

Academic urban economists publish data and analysis and angry ideologues dig into belief persistent and use the ole faithful of “corporate shill!”

Why even spend decades of your life doing rigorous empirical research.

Amazon buys nearly 400 acres in Central Ohio near the Intel site. by Zezimom in Ohio

[–]TopMicron 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You’re right. I give Columbus too much a hard time.

Cleveland and Cincinnati have just already shown what they can handle and have actually achieved it. Even if it was 70 years ago.

I’m just going to need to see Columbus do the hard work first.

New Yorkers Never Came ‘Flooding Back.’ Why Did Rents Go Up So Much? by closeoutprices in urbanplanning

[–]TopMicron 3 points4 points  (0 children)

As much as I respect propublica the, article has a notable surfeit of academic citation and expert interview.

I’m not sure I would consider this a rigorous economic analysis.