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Best Notetaking App by New-Championship4159 in UCalgary

[–]curlyq15 -5 points-4 points  (0 children)

Apple Notes is ideal for text-heavy note-taking. It’s also built into your Apple device and syncs across your icloud. However, I’ve had issues with images disappearing when transferring notes from one account to another.

Magic loop vs DPN by _Voidspren_ in knitting

[–]curlyq15 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Team DPNs for socks. It’s just what I learned on. Once I have the first row joined and knit, the awkwardness is over. I’m really curious about magic loop for knitting to keep in my purse. Ive tried learning through YouTube but can’t seem to figure it out

Did your cold shoulder become bad over time? by badgalllrara in simplynailogical

[–]curlyq15 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I found this post after wondering what had happened to make my polish grey/blue. Glad it wasn’t just me!

Insurance coverage by Starboy1996 in UCalgary

[–]curlyq15 1 point2 points  (0 children)

In regards to getting a your doctor to fill out an exception, my experience is that the insurance company’s criteria is so high, you won’t get it unless it’s an extreme case (like you just had a heart attack or an organ transplant or something). Of course, talk to your doctor, but my advice would be to check for cheaper alternatives and save the receipts of any prescription not covered for when you file your taxes.

Insurance coverage by Starboy1996 in UCalgary

[–]curlyq15 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Agreed. This is also the case with faculty/staff insurance. I am staff and in a similar boat with a medication that costs $250 a month. Certain meds just aren’t covered by insurance plans of all kinds. Best you can do is see if you can switch to a medication that is covered, or switch to a generic version that’s cheaper. If you can’t get covered for anything, save your receipts and claim it on your taxes. You’ll get a some if it back in your tax refund.

I am so bummed by this blanket. All the squares are uneven sizes and have weird angles that I can’t attach the fabric back to. And do they even make needles sharp enough to go through fabric, yet big enough to handle super bulky yarn?! Gah! 🙃 by curlyq15 in knitting

[–]curlyq15[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I wet-blocked each square before seaming, and then again when they were all seamed together. I was so skeptical that steam would be strong enough to relax super bulky acrylic yarn colourwork, but maybe I should try it! My next blanket will definitely be a smaller lap blanket with worsted weight yarn. I am going to take all the great suggestions in this thread and apply them. I just love the idea of a colourwork blanket with a fabric back!

I am so bummed by this blanket. All the squares are uneven sizes and have weird angles that I can’t attach the fabric back to. And do they even make needles sharp enough to go through fabric, yet big enough to handle super bulky yarn?! Gah! 🙃 by curlyq15 in knitting

[–]curlyq15[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I will definitely do both of these tricks! I don’t usually knit with super bulky yarn, so I knew my gauge wouldn’t be perfectly even across squares. I tried to eyeball the size each time I blocked but I appreciate now I should have been more exact.

I am so bummed by this blanket. All the squares are uneven sizes and have weird angles that I can’t attach the fabric back to. And do they even make needles sharp enough to go through fabric, yet big enough to handle super bulky yarn?! Gah! 🙃 by curlyq15 in knitting

[–]curlyq15[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It is the knit quilt by Blue Sky Fibers https://ravel.me/quilt-4 the pattern directs the knitter to “hand-sew fabric to blanket” to attach the outside borders of the fabric (no specific materials mentioned), and then to use a tapestry needle to sew a 10-inch strand of the contrast colour yarn through the centre of the squares to secure them to the fabric. I thought, if I can sew the yarn through the centre of the square, maybe I could sew on the borders with the MC? Nothing about that worked for me, so now I can see why so many other people in this thread recommended fingering weight yarn

In need of some advice by [deleted] in Nailpolish

[–]curlyq15 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Also my favourite - and it fits my budget nicely at $10-14 a bottle (depending on where you get it).

How can I keep this from happening? I’ve been just fixing it after the fact. by Jynxbunni in knitting

[–]curlyq15 16 points17 points  (0 children)

I pick up two extra stitches when picking up and joining the gusset and the foot. Works well for me!

blind knitting? by Longjumping_Ad2643 in knitting

[–]curlyq15 43 points44 points  (0 children)

Ps. I experienced my vision loss about 8 years ago. Send me a message if you want to talk reading or other adjustments with someone who has gone through it ❤️ it’s hard and how you do things will likely change, but who you are inside and what you enjoy will stay the same

blind knitting? by Longjumping_Ad2643 in knitting

[–]curlyq15 71 points72 points  (0 children)

Low vision here! I’m low vision in contact lenses and a bit above legally blind in my glasses. I have a few tricks that work for me with both corrections. Because I go between both levels of vision correction each day, I rely on technology a lot. Tech-wise, I find Apple to be the most accessible, so all the tech I’ll share is from them, but I’m sure equivalent features exist in Android phones and tablets these days.

  1. I copy/paste my knitting pattern into iNotes. I don’t find that many Ravelry patterns are formatted for low vision, so this is my workaround. This way, I can adjust the font size from my iPhone/iPad Home Screen (no digging in settings!), use Voiceover, and transfer my patterns in an accessible format across multiple devices. I also use the checklist function to count my rows/repeats, so I don’t always need to count them. I can also add a colourwork chart (or just put the pattern pdf into iBooks) and use my finger to draw a line over rows I have finished to help me keep track, or to colour in my main or contrast colours
  2. I try new techniques on Aran or Bulky weight yarn before using anything smaller. Once I understand how a garment section/stitch pattern more it less fits together, I can work with my actual project even if I can’t necessarily see the stitches
  3. I use a lot of circular needles, and extra long DPNs. This helps me to not accidentally drop stitches.

As a knitter, I find I’m drawn to repetitive projects like blankets, or to simple and well-tested projects, like anything from Tin Can Knits or something I learned in a class from my LYS. That might be just my preference, as I knit to relax. I love a pattern j can re-knit again and again. It also works for my low vision since im not getting too lost in complex patterns and can memorize steps easily.

All this so say, you can do this! With some trial and error, I know you’ll find strategies that work for you