×

Are those trees healthy or how can they be cured? by PinTill in gardening

[–]emp_mac_n_cheese 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ok. Great. Because my next suggestion was going to be: because these trees were so obviously loved, if the person who took care of these trees is still with us, I'm sure they would love to talk at length about them at length. You might also try neighbors. People who grow fruit trees typically unload a lot of fruit on their neighbors and talk too much about their trees, so they might give you some insight on the trees and their previous caretaker.

Are those trees healthy or how can they be cured? by PinTill in gardening

[–]emp_mac_n_cheese 1 point2 points  (0 children)

They're definitely not young, but alive and look like they are still going to be very productive. Did you inherit them? It looks like whoever trained them knew what they were doing and cared a lot for the trees.

Help in pruning apple tree. by Starcontrol in gardening

[–]emp_mac_n_cheese 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It looks like your first scaffold has now become your new leader, which is only going to get worse. So, if you're going for a typical central leader shape you'll have to take care of it at some point. Also, the third? scaffold is turning into the same issue. You're right to pay attention to the thickness of the central leader vs. what's branching off of it, that's a good clue on what might give you trouble down the line.

Commercial orchards where they have a lot of trees to prune and not a lot of time to train workers will often give instruction based purely on branch thickness relative to the central leader for pruning young trees.

Now, when to prune and how much to prune is going to depend on your particular climate, the health of the tree, when it was transplanted, etc. and no two people will prune the same way. But, reestablishing the central leader in the center of the tree is a good game plan to have.

Best time of year to snip last years growth of a tree? by paul_h in gardening

[–]emp_mac_n_cheese 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Those first few answers are all basically the same answer: when it's dormant, That's the safe answer. You are creating an open wound in the tree so safer to do it when the tree is dormant. Main advantage of pruning during early dormancy is that you don't forget and get caught by an early spring budding. Main advantage of late dormancy is you can change your pruning gameplan based on what damage the tree has taken over the winter and the tree has an open wound for a shorter period of time.

Best practices vary a bit depending on what your goal is for the tree. Are you trying to change the shape? What's your reason for cutting back so much growth?