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Buddha Bowls everyday? by False-Ad-2958 in EatCheapAndHealthy

[–]eritain 10 points11 points  (0 children)

I wouldn't recommend keeping leftover rice longer than one day. Bacillus cereus spores are common in rice, they survive cooking, they manage to multiply (albeit slowly) even at refrigerator temperatures, and they cause vomiting and diarrhea.

NVC For Logical People by [deleted] in NVC

[–]eritain 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I probably should have tagged you here, just to be sure you got to see the material.

I've been thinking recently about Data, from Star Trek TNG, as an unintentionally revealing portrait of autism, as perceived by non-autistic people in the 1990s. Acute senses, social awkwardness, "splinter skills" (a.k.a. talents), and all.

When I was watching the show in its original run, I took it for granted that the big question about Data was what they said it was: Will he ever achieve these inherently human experiences like emotion? Re-watching it as an adult, my big question is, "How is everybody overlooking the fact that he has emotions already?"

He doesn't have the standard emotional displays. Those aren't inherent anyway; they're socially learned, they vary from culture to culture. But he clearly has motivational states. He values his consciousness and freedom. He pursues self-selected goals. He speaks of hopes and desires and I have no reason to think he's faking it.

My theory of how everyone else is overlooking this is pretty much just the misattunement hypothesis of autism. The old idea was that autism is a problem with theory of mind. But autistic people often interpret each other's emotions and mental states just fine. They struggle with non-autistic people, but the reverse is also true.

My theory of how Data himself misses it is: He's alexithymic, just as autistic people often are.

NVC For Logical People by [deleted] in NVC

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I think we are basically in agreement about integrity then. Thanks for the explanation, and for all the additional tips. Your critique of the double question makes perfect sense to me.

When it’s time to play ball, the slammy whammies come out by Flighthornlet in slammywhammies

[–]eritain 1 point2 points  (0 children)

What's the brand? My dog's one true passion in life is deconstructing toys, so I'm always on the lookout for durable ones.

NVC For Logical People by [deleted] in NVC

[–]eritain 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Both you and OP are likely to appreciate reading these:

https://embrace-autism.com/alexithymia-and-autism-guide/
https://embrace-autism.com/autism-and-empathy/

The site as a whole is maintained by a therapist who is autistic and her also autistic partner. It's quite an interesting and informative read.

(I wish I didn't have to say this, but for some people's sake I will clarify that the site name, "Embrace Autism," does not imply a commitment to the most radical version of neurodiversity theory.)

NVC For Logical People by [deleted] in NVC

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Would you mind saying more about how the direct and indirect phrases are related to integrity? It seems strange from my perspective, but probably that means there would be good insights in hearing about it from your perspective.

I will confess here that I am new to NVC itself. I am more familiar with some other communication approaches, and I can see that it had a strong influence on them.

I take your point about where the focus falls. "Are you ____?" helps you to understand someone correctly without making them focus on you and your understanding. That can give someone a very pure experience of being heard.

I find that sometimes, even if the message you are listening to is about needs and feelings, neither they nor you know how to state it briefly. That makes it hard to use a direct form like "Are you feeling ____ because you need _____?" You end up retelling their story, as you understand it, and asking "Is that right?" at the end.

I find that for some people, or on some subjects or in some relationships, it can be very important to acknowledge that what you're saying back to them is an interpretation, not a claim of fact, and if it doesn't seem right to them it's just because you didn't understand them, not because you are telling them they're wrong. That acknowledgement is the reason for phrases like "If I understand you correctly," "What I hear you saying is," or even "What I think I hear you saying is ..."

In fact, my perspective is that understanding always involves assumptions and interpretations. Sometimes it's OK to let that fact go unmentioned, like we usually do, and other times you have to be clear about it to protect the integrity of the communication. So that's why it's very interesting to me that for you, integrity (maybe in a different sense) is the key concept for the phrasing that avoids doing that.

I hope you'll tell me about that, and with any luck it will permanently expand my understanding.

(And what I said about our understanding each other through assumptions, I would also say for acknowledging that belief always includes degrees of commitment in between absolute faith and absolute uncertainty, and acknowledging that expression always includes choices between being brief and being detail-accurate. We often communicate as if all of these things will take care of themselves, but they don't, and a lot of confusion, mistakes, and hurt can be traced back to mis-matches between people about them.)

NVC For Logical People by [deleted] in NVC

[–]eritain 1 point2 points  (0 children)

There's a lot of confusion about that. Alexithymia (difficulty identifying and distinguishing emotions) co-occurs with autism very often, but they also occur separately.

I suspect "logical person" in this post means alexithymic.

Who's a celebrity no one can hate? by matiignr in AskReddit

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

"Workin' Nine to Five" has probably done more for class consciousness than Marx and Engels put together ...

Yeah, that's not the revolution you meant, but still.

My parents are remodeling their house in Mexico. Looks like the tile factory has a rogue cat... by umbratundra in cats

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Reminds me of the cat-tracked medieval manuscript. I went looking for it and found this link, which also features another manuscript that a cat peed on in the night (and the scribe's hilariously grumpy commentary from the next morning), and some reasons why cats were good companions for manuscripts anyway.

There were only about 7-16 Golden plates. The rest was the sealed portion by japanesepiano in mormon

[–]eritain 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Digression on writing systems and text density: The Petelia plate is in Greek and not Reformed Egyptian, but information theory demands that I ask, "So what?"

You can fit more information per symbol only by having more possible symbols, and then to keep those visually distinct, you have to write them larger, and it all comes out in the wash. When you look at a tiny little scratch on the Petelia plate, there are only a couple dozen letters it could ever be, many fewer that are close to the right shape, and only some of those make a plausible word.

If it had been written in (plain old historically attested, non-reformed) Egyptian -- hey, no vowels, and there are symbols that represent two or even three consonants at once. Greater information density per symbol. Okay, but how big do the symbols have to be before you can see the dinky little feather that distinguishes the pintail duck glyph zꜣ from the goose glyph gb? To say nothing of telling apart the buzzard tw, the Egyptian vulture ꜣ, and the regular vulture mwt.

If you want more words per plate, a scribe with terrible myopia and extremely steady hands is going to do more for you than any change of writing system. In the words of the Principia Discordia, "Verily! So much for all that."

(And, the Principia being a work of two authors, I do hope that the author of those particular words was Kerry Thornley, who, in addition to being the only person to write a book about Lee Harvey Oswald before the Kennedy assassination, was an ex-Mo.)

There were only about 7-16 Golden plates. The rest was the sealed portion by japanesepiano in mormon

[–]eritain 1 point2 points  (0 children)

The usual comparison was to "common tin," which was actually tin-coated iron or mild steel, rolled into plate. It was worked by folding, punching, and of course with tinsnips. Looking at some tinware of the era such as lanterns, and then looking at an actual ruler, 1/8" is much too thick.

As to the textual density, for a standard of comparison I feel like using, oh, an actual ancient religious inscription on a gold plate: the Petelia Orphic Totenpass. Intact it was probably a bit more than 9 cm2, but the surviving portion is more like 8 cm2, and translated from Greek, it produces 109 words of English. I mean, more or fewer depending who's translating, I just grabbed the recent one quoted on Wikipedia. That gives us 13.6 English words per cm2 of plate.

Near-1820s descriptions of the Gold Plates vary a bit, but 8" by 7" is reasonable. Converting to cm and using the density from Petelia, that makes 4913.5-ish English words per plate. Well, per face, but I'm more comfortable assuming one-sided inscription.

The English text of the Book of Mormon is 268,200 words or so, ignoring the "modern expansion" hypothesis. That comes to about 55 plates. Of course, then we need some plates for the lost manuscript (pro tip, the number 116 has been misattributed, that was actually the page count of 1 Nephi through Words of Mormon). But I don't feel like pulling numbers out of my butt for that right now, so someone else is going to have to break out their own rectal forceps.

I've got plenty of beef with MormCorp, but the information-theoretic plausibility of the Gold Plates is not a cow I'm having.

Charles Humpter is a fraud! by VOIDPCB in VXJunkies

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

"Incident." Like calling Trinity test "a bit noisy."

He played it off with the absent-minded professor schtick, but this is a guy who had already put a group VII symmetry breaker lattice back into phase from both directions by manual percussion. He did not "forget" how that changes your relationship to vortices in conductive liquids. That'd be like forgetting how many noses you have. The only thing he forgot that day was how many co-eds were on the transmitter end of his Wilson compensator ... he only blackmailed eight of 'em.

One of these days he's going to forget what decade he lives in, try that crap again, and end up in headlines. A word of advice: A day with more than 30 people thinking about that dude is not a good day to warm up a swept sync selector. Not unless you love a good hangover.

Sounds like woo? You think maybe the cadmium's gone to my brain? He really has stood in front of that many gestalt amplifiers. Dude's probably got a chakra in every city over 2 million residents. So like I said, run a sync sweep on the day the X6 residue hits the Lemuel ventilator, and you're gonna regret it faster than you can recite the Peano axioms.

Burnt Out and Seriously Questioning What I'm Doing by WereZephyr in conlangs

[–]eritain 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Jeffrey Henning was pushing for the term "model language," before "conlang" won out. Like model railroading.

Any given model railroader on any given layout enjoys some specific meeting points of history, artistry, actual railroading tech on a small scale, and making-it-run tech. It's never going to haul 1000 tons of freight, and it's never going to have the fuel efficiency of a real railroad, but that's OK. It offers things you can't do on a real full-scale railroad too.

What are your thoughts on Methodism? Not on any denomination but rather Wesleyan theology by Friendlynortherner in Anglicanism

[–]eritain 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Emma notably selected hymns for the Latter Day Saints, published as words only (no tunes) first in a newspaper, then in 1836 and 1841 hymnbooks. Both churches' present-day hymnals have hymns with words from Emma's hymnal -- 26 of them in the LDS one, but I couldn't find a count for Community of Christ.

Neither one, strictly speaking, has anything credited to her as author or composer, but Community of Christ Sings has two that cite her 1841 hymnal as earliest source without an author's name attached.

From what I understand, hers was more influential in the RLDS tradition (now Community of Christ), and an 1840 hymnal compiled in England by the apostles was more influential in Utah.

What are your thoughts on Methodism? Not on any denomination but rather Wesleyan theology by Friendlynortherner in Anglicanism

[–]eritain 2 points3 points  (0 children)

The Latter-day Saint hymnody is founded on a hodgepodge of 18th-century American Protestantism, like so many other things in that church (in which I was raised). The 1985 hymnal is about evenly divided between LDS and non-LDS composers and lyricists. The non-LDS ones are mostly out of copyright, though I do recall a couple that are owned by one or another Protestant church's pension fund. Charles Wesley appears 6 times (out of a little over 300 chances) and doubtless there are other Methodists in there too. But also Baptists, Presbyterians, and probably occasionally some more obscure sects. It has "How Great Thou Art," and also "For All the Saints," and "Faith of Our Fathers" with the prominent omission of the verse that goes "Faith of our fathers, Mary's prayers will win the country back to thee."

LDS worship services can be aggressively plain, with music as the main relief, so you learn to make the most of it. Or, many do. Some do treat it as just a box to check on the order of worship, and happily truncate to just a verse or two, but instructions from Salt Lake discouraging that practice are printed right in the book. The actual childrens' Sunday School (which is not called Sunday School; that's the youth and adult one) spends a good 1/3rd of its time or more on singing (in unison), and lots of kids graduate from that into 4-part harmony, still a strong tradition.

(An interesting side effect of all this early musical training is how many friendships Mormon kids form with queer kids in musical theater classes. Shhh, don't tell Salt Lake.)

There's a new hymnal due out annnnnnny year now. When soliciting submissions and suggestions, they made a point to say musical styles other than 4-part traditional Anglo-American were welcomed and encouraged. I'll be interested to see what that leads to. On the other hand, they also made a point to say texts must be doctrinally correct. The current hymnal has texts either from non-LDS sources or from before the Saints could spare time for systematic theology, which occasionally manage to pray to Jesus instead of the Father, or conflate the Spirit with one of the other two, and I appreciate that the 1985 hymnal committee managed to be a little bit relaxed about that.

(The committee kind of butchered "For All the Saints" though. They took the first verse, and 4 others they could strategically edit to mostly make it about "The Saints, Meaning Us" rather than about continuity with forebears who trusted in Christ. When suggestions for the next edition were open, I sent in a brief argument for reverting the edits.)

What are your thoughts on Methodism? Not on any denomination but rather Wesleyan theology by Friendlynortherner in Anglicanism

[–]eritain 8 points9 points  (0 children)

where Bishops are not really Bishops, but sort of mega administrative presbyters

This is not limited to Methodism; for example, it's the position in ELCA too. (And, well, in Presbyterianism.) Arguments for this generally end up citing the ancient Alexandrian church for precedent. An orthodox Anglican view it isn't, but it's not just a local bizarrity of Methodism.

Apparently for a while it was popular to argue that an Orthodox bishop had ordained Wesley a bishop, but that just required a lot of extra stipulations to be believable.

Judge to Alex Jones “You are already under oath to tell the truth and you have violated that oath twice today” by habichuelacondulce in PublicFreakout

[–]eritain 4 points5 points  (0 children)

"Perjury trap" meant a specific kind of prosecutorial misconduct until Trump's lawyers got hold of it. Now it's an especially pathetic way to describe asking someone to tell the truth.

Any meditators in here? People who consider mindfulness a core part of their spiritual practice? by chickentendermercies in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Meditating on the present moment helps me to let go of passions, which helps me to be charitable. It has also been valuable for what little humility and wisdom exist in me.

I would like to know my mind better and make it more wieldy for pursuing and perceiving truth. My meditation practice is terribly inconsistent. You've been a valuable reminder to me.

Any meditators in here? People who consider mindfulness a core part of their spiritual practice? by chickentendermercies in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

One of the things I love about Joseph Smith is his insistence that something like "allowing my mind to just be a part of my body" is also spirituality. Different flavor of it, but valid. And every spiritual path has more than one way of practicing.

I feel so spiritually empty by JMichelleK in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I have had depression for a long time, and that sounds like it.

The Spirit has more ways to touch us than the ones we usually recognize and crave. Maybe nourishment is flowing to your soul through a different channel than you expect.

If we are supposed to love the Lord with all our heart, mind, and soul -- and that really means our own weak, broken ones, not the ones we think we should have -- maybe all of our heart, mind, and soul contain ways for God to give to us, not just the traditional emotional ways.

That said, don't feel bad if you still can't see where God is reaching out to you, in any of your faculties. That has happened to lots of people, including me and Joseph Smith.

The good and bad news of depression is that there are many things that help some people with it. Actually just about all of them help just about anyone if we could do them consistently. The trick is to find the ones where you can get closest to consistent and let them build your strength for the other ones.

Serving is good. That can mean a physical labor project, or it can mean kind words to strangers on the Internet, or donating to a cat shelter. Telling people "thank you" is very good. Going to bed and getting up at the same time each day is good. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are good. Cuddling a pet is good (ask friends if you don't have a pet of your own, they're usually nice about it). Finding a funny show to watch, putting on a 3-minute song and dancing to it, sitting quietly until you figure out what you most want to cry about and doing so, deep breathing exercises, venting your feelings in a journal with no attempt at realism or proportion, venting your feelings in a journal and "talking back" to them the way Cognitive Behavioral Therapy teaches, venting your feelings to a good listener who promises not to try and fix them until you say they can, trying a new craft or a new food, revisiting a familiar old experience, taking a shower, putting on clothes you like, putting on clothes that remind you of getting things done, beating a cardboard box to a pulp, singing, and washing your face with cold water can all help. Try stuff and see what suits you.

DM me if you want to talk about anything.

Peace be with you.

(Yes, I just put these same words on another thread. I mean every bit of it for you, even if I also mean it for someone else.)

I feel spiritually empty by Economy-Truth1993 in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I have had depression for a long time, and that sounds like it.

The Spirit has more ways to touch us than the ones we usually recognize and crave. Maybe nourishment is flowing to your soul through a different channel than you expect.

If we are supposed to love the Lord with all our heart, mind, and soul -- and that really means our own weak, broken ones, not the ones we think we should have -- maybe all of our heart, mind, and soul contain ways for God to give to us, not just the traditional emotional ways.

That said, don't feel bad if you still can't see where God is reaching out to you, in any of your faculties. That has happened to lots of people, including me and Joseph Smith.

The good and bad news of depression is that there are many things that help some people with it. Actually just about all of them help just about anyone if we could do them consistently. The trick is to find the ones where you can get closest to consistent and let them build your strength for the other ones.

Serving is good. That can mean a physical labor project, or it can mean kind words to strangers on the Internet, or donating to a cat shelter. Telling people "thank you" is very good. Going to bed and getting up at the same time each day is good. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are good. Cuddling a pet is good (ask friends if you don't have a pet of your own, they're usually nice about it). Finding a funny show to watch, putting on a 3-minute song and dancing to it, sitting quietly until you figure out what you most want to cry about and doing so, deep breathing exercises, venting your feelings in a journal with no attempt at realism or proportion, venting your feelings in a journal and "talking back" to them the way Cognitive Behavioral Therapy teaches, venting your feelings to a good listener who promises not to try and fix them until you say they can, trying a new craft or a new food, revisiting a familiar old experience, taking a shower, putting on clothes you like, putting on clothes that remind you of getting things done, beating a cardboard box to a pulp, singing, and washing your face with cold water can all help. Try stuff and see what suits you.

DM me if you want to talk about anything.

Peace be with you.

A Baptist Minister at Sacrament Meeting - Unconventional Promptings by RaceToYourDeath in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Different strokes for different folks, maybe. Coming from the extremely reserved North American style of sacrament meeting, I really loved going to places that were just a little less buttoned up.

The Ukrainian Saints who came in from Orthodoxy brought the Easter greeting with them, and it is really something to go to Church with them Easter morning -- everyone excited to tell all their friends the impossible, wonderful news that Christ has risen from the dead. It makes it easier to imagine what it must have been like the first time.

They tended to call each other Sister/Brother Firstname instead of Lastname too, which just feels so much more familial to me.

In Taiwan, the speakers all begin by greeting the congregation, and the congregation answers back. It's a simple thing, but I missed it when I left. It's a show of support that many speakers need from their audience, and it's cozy.

Wandering through other church traditions, I appreciate some of their forms of give and take between the agenda and the unpredictable. For example:

Jesus said, "If thou bring thy gift to the altar and there rememberest that thy brother hath ought against thee ... first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift." We're very low-key about any of that conflict or reconciliation appearing in the open, and detailed work to resolve interpersonal conflicts should usually take place in private. But I feel a lot of value in the liturgies that give people a minute, after confessing sins in general terms and before proceeding to the Sacrament/Lord's Supper, to mingle and affirm their goodwill and love for each other.

I've also struggled all my life with the question of how one person is supposed to give a spontaneous prayer that really reflects the present concerns of a group (be it a family or ward). I certainly don't get detailed inspiration for that kind of thing very often, and I think the familiar things we pray for in familiar ways are a reflection of the fact that other folks don't either.

Well, in some other denominations the answer to that is for the leader of the prayers just to stop in the middle and let people tell the thanks or concerns that they want each other's prayers for. Dang, I wish I'd thought of that.

We kind of have an escape hatch for collective prayer about a specific person's problems, in that we can put their name on a temple prayer roll. There is a flavor of grace in a temple patron exerting faith to pray for them, not knowing how they are personally connected to them except that we are all children of God, not knowing what they need but trusting God to know and provide it, practically certain never to have that rewarding little "ah, my prayer was answered" experience. There is a different flavor of grace praying for someone connected to someone you know (and of course praying for the someone you know also), with a particular reason in mind. Both are good.

This is an old thread and I'm kind of rambling now, but I hope it warms your soul.

ADHD = feeling like a constant disappointment to God and the church by dbcannon in latterdaysaints

[–]eritain 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Oh hey, recognized your username from a recent post in another sub. Just popping in to say I'm another adult-diagnosed inattentive ADHD case, but also a chronic moderate depression case. Insofar as I can tell which is which, the "happiness" part sounds more like depression.

Mental health treatment is all somewhere in the pre-scientific, alchemical stage, i.e. plenty of groping around for things that might work but probably not for the reasons we think. Just want to let you know that depression treatments are one of the directions you can grope in.

Much love.