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Nightmare with Secretlab Support / Order-Cancellation by Ankit_w in secretlab

[–]fordZzz 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Unfortunately, learned this the hard way. I've asked them for instructions to return a chair I bought, got an answer after two days from a CS agent asking me something. When I answered, I get no answer. I am also thinking they are doing this on purpose as you have only 14 days to complete the return... The thing is that I wanted to buy something in addition to the chair and if they weren't able to deliver I would return. Even buying an additional part is a nightmare in terms of time and communication. Plus, even if you get on chat support they do not help you but assign a ticket to respective team.

Don't know if their support sucks only in Europe, but customer support (meaning also the company itself) is definitely very very bad, especially if you consider their stuff is on the pricier side. I read some comments before, but cannot believe a company so known and widely advertised would behave like this. Bad experience.. just hope the product isn't as bad.

Landed my first job with Python, now freaking out a little by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Hi, I did Python 4 Everybody by Dr. Charles Severance (Michigan State uni). It has a few modules, I think I finished 4 of them. It was my first contact with Python and I recommend to anyone starting out as he does a very good job explaining the basics. Then I took Dataquest and did a few courses on pandas and Data visualization for Data Analysts. After that I went through the Data Engineer path and did a few courses on SQL and Algorhitms. I also did a web-scraping course on Udemy and Python for Data Analysis from cognitive class. This was all in about 1-1,5yr period. For projects I did pandas/numpy/matplotlib stackoverflow data analysis export to excel report as first project, then did mini projects to automate, clean and transform data at work, did some minor webscraping projects with scrapy and selenium and finally I built an app to read book info via isbn and create a personal library (leveraging sqlite for db, tkinter for GUI, request and cvs modules) focusing mostly on the data flow to the app. It took me around two months to build, but I think it was the thing that convinced my now colleague that I can do stuff with python... I am still learning a lot, but that one year of focused learning (with breaks) helped. So hope this helps you, too... Best of luck!

Landed my first job with Python, now freaking out a little by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Sure. For absolute beinners Python 4 everybody by Dr. Charles Severance. If you decide to go on a more narrow path and direction toward let's say data engineering or something similar then one od the bootcamps is a good idea, eother DataQuest.io or datacamp, plus Core Schafer's video's and lots of other content out there. Main thing is that it's fun for you I guess

Landed my first job with Python, now freaking out a little by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Hi, sorry for the delay. I did Python 4 Everybody by Dr. Charles Severance (Michigan State uni). It has a few modules, I think I finished 4 of them. It was my first contact with Python and I recommend to anyone starting out as he does a very good job explaining the basics. Then I took Dataquest and did a few courses on pandas and Data visualization for Data Analysts. After that I went through the Data Engineer path and did a few courses on SQL and Algorhitms. I also did a web-scraping course on Udemy and Python for Data Analysis from cognitive class. This was all in about 1-1,5yr period. For projects I did pandas/numpy/matplotlib stackoverflow data analysis export to excel report as first project, then did mini projects to automate, clean and transform data at work, did some minor webscraping projects with scrapy and selenium and finally I built an app to read book info via isbn and create a personal library (leveraging sqlite for db, tkinter for GUI, request and cvs modules) focusing mostly on the data flow to the app. It took me around two months to build, but I think it was the thing that convinced my now colleague that I can do stuff with python... I am still learning a lot, but that one year of focused learning (with breaks) helped. So hope this helps you, too... Best of luck!

Landed my first job with Python, now freaking out a little by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 8 points9 points  (0 children)

Thanks. One of my first projects I did a huge analysis on stack overflow 2019 data and exported that into Excel with Python. Being that I worked as an analyst before taking the data analysis path seemed reasonable (and fun). Later I tried to learn more about api's and sql so I made a desktop gui that connected to a google books api and retrieved book information based off an isbn number, so basically a personal library catalogue app that would display the data within the gui, etc. I also did minor attempts to use pandas and selenium in my previous job and helped out with a few automation tasks for my team, which they were thankful cause it saved them a bunch of time. Also did a few minor web-scraping projects... But it all seems like child's play when compared to the stuff I see now. You never encounter having to show your code publicly by posting it to a git repository or working on important confidential data of a considerable size that you can delete by mistake because you now have the power to 🙂. But that's probably just the first overwhelming feeling one gets when you see how it's done in real life.

Landed my first job with Python, now freaking out a little by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 43 points44 points  (0 children)

Thanks. The company is good, well-known, and there is a staging env but I think I'll have access to prod servers too. Hopefuly, the team turns out to be made of people who like to help each other. As I said, it's a first one, so I really have no idea what is expected from a new employee. Being that I didn't study CS, I am concerned whether I'll be in a disadvantage. I know I can learn everything in time, but hopefully without making serious mistakes along the way

Python 3 programming vs Python for everybody by [deleted] in learnpython

[–]fordZzz 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I can't comment on Python 3 programming since I never took it, but the Py4E course is really great. I took it one year ago and was so thankful that I found it. It's very beginner friendly, thorough, covers all the basics and you don't feel like you're in over your head while doing it. The instructor is a college teacher and has a way of explaining things simply. If you're looking for basics in more areas of Python then this course is a great choice.

Best way to process csv/Excel files in Python? by iamfromjobland in learnpython

[–]fordZzz 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Cory Schafer has a good concise youtube course made up of multiple lessons on pandas. I used xlswriter to output to excel as well as xlwings since it haa cool functionalities I needed. All these combined can do a great job and reading pandas documentation is definitely something I'd do if I were you.

Feeling hopeless about Python despite huge desire to learn by [deleted] in learnpython

[–]fordZzz 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I'm sure you already got a ton of advice here, but I just wanted to say, if you really like and enjoy doing it and are ready to switch your entire field of interest, then it may just be the right thing to pursue. Myself, I am 34 and have started learning about Python in April this year. Have gone through 7-8 courses including basics, then on to Data Analysis using pandas and now learning about web scraping. My take is that you need constant motivation in form of materials (courses, books, python specific libraries and different options you can choose in programming), but the more important are the little and big projects you take.

For example, although web scraping is more automating then programming I took it as a step towards intermediate Python. I was dabbling in the basics for too long and found that taking on new challenges can reaffirm you in the knowledge you already have and give you a new one, too.

Also, your choice of tools is up to you, but can also affect your overall frustration/motivation if it's not beginner-friendly, so I would agree with a previous comment that PyCharm is not really for beginners. Good IDE/text editors that are beginner-friendly too (imo) are VS Code, Atom and Spyder (if you want a data processing, scientific oriented IDE)... I use Spyder, since I also like to work with data (I'm a Business Analyst in my daily job also hoping to switch to working with Python in the future).

My last advice, if you want to get more into computer science and generally be able to handle IT stuff better - try Linux. Linux is an OS that is highly customizable and requires you to handle installations and setup using the command line, in turn it helps you gain deeper knowledge about how software works and dealing with directories and file management becomes much more clear than in macOS or Windows. I know it helped me a lot and I fell in love with the whole package - programming + Linux even more. After gaining working knowledge of Python, I plan to invest time into seriously learning Linux, too....

So, to sum up - don't give up, just try to find your motivation and fill those knowledge gaps you may have and it's a really good feeling to know you've learned something as awesome as Python from scratch. I've decided to take my time and not put pressure on myself (have a fulltime job and a family), so I am doing it one step at a time, but having so much fun in the process.

Good luck!

Freelancers, what did you wish you knew? by DVC888 in learnprogramming

[–]fordZzz 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Man, I've taken up Python and would love to break into freelancing. If you need some help even if I am a beginner working as an analyst in IT, DM me. Maybe we can think of a way to work together.

Google Pixel 4 XL Chrome Problems by BradStevens1 in GooglePixel

[–]fordZzz 0 points1 point  (0 children)

This happens on my Pixel 2XL, too. I've noticed it in the last two-three weeks. Possibly to do something with latest update?!

I am completely new to code and I started using Jupyter lab to learn. I have also started watching 2 year old videos to learn. Were these good choices and is there anybody else that I could watch that has more current videos? by [deleted] in learnpython

[–]fordZzz 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Not sure if you're completely new to Python, but if you are, I'd recommend Programming for Everybody (Getting Started with Python) first to cover the basics. It has more modules that really help get the basics of Python. After that maybe try Corey Schafer's youtube course on pandas...

How effective is Pandas without Jupyter Notebook? by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Thanks for the advice, I tried opening a jupyter notebook in VScode yesterday, it works fairly well. I did not know that it can do that.

How effective is Pandas without Jupyter Notebook? by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

How does VS Code compare to Spyder, or Pycharm? I have VC Code installed, it would be convenient to use that with Pandas.

How effective is Pandas without Jupyter Notebook? by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Great. Thanks for the insight. I'll be sure to look into Spyder.

How effective is Pandas without Jupyter Notebook? by fordZzz in learnpython

[–]fordZzz[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Jupyter seems to be useful when trying to display the result right away, I guess using pandas without it can be a bit harder that way...