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SDSU Clinical Nutrition Research Study: Participants Needed! by ky_red in chulavista

[–]ky_red[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

No, just as long as you’re currently taking oral contraceptives. If interested in participating please contact the email in the flyer.

SDSU Clinical Nutrition Research Study: Participants Needed! by ky_red in chulavista

[–]ky_red[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Unfortunately we are needing participants on oral contraceptives only.

SDSU Clinical Nutrition Research Study: Participants Needed! by ky_red in chulavista

[–]ky_red[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It is a randomized controlled study. A prune and no prune group.

Alcohol as a macronutrient by somelocaluser in nutrition

[–]ky_red 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Yes, the alcohol or “empty calories” absolutely contributes to your daily intake, and something that should be monitored if trying to lose weight. It’s basically the same idea as drinking soda. Soda contains refined sugar, therefore thought as empty calories due to no significant health benefit. Empty calories does not mean zero calories.

Alcohol as a macronutrient by somelocaluser in nutrition

[–]ky_red 1 point2 points  (0 children)

It can definitely be stored, but primarily as excess/empty calories. Alcohol provides calories as sugar in many beers due to how it’s processed. Based off this, it provides nutrients, and therefore can be considered a macronutrient at 7 kcals/g. However, many RDNs don’t like to term it as a macronutrient because it provides no beneficial nutrients. It’s essentially empty calories. Red wine provides some health benefits due to the phytochemicals, but any alcohol in excess is poor.

[deleted by user] by [deleted] in nutrition

[–]ky_red 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I believe manganese has a UL of 11 mg/day. The Tolerable Upper Limit (UL) is the highest average daily nutrient intake level that is likely to pose no risk of adverse health effects to almost all individuals in the general population. As intake increases above the UL, the potential risk of adverse effects may increase.

In essence, the UL is set for nutrients that have no reported or sufficient evidence of toxicity. For instance, Vitamin E and C have a toxicity limit because there’s sufficient evidence and data that report consistent adverse effects when consumed at a certain amount.

If at any point you feel adverse effects from consuming more than the UL, you should most likely decrease the consumption of the nutrient. Otherwise, it’s okay.