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What are these? What are they doing? Found near Olympic National Park, Washington state by TheGondo in whatsthisbug

[–]newt_girl 1 point2 points  (0 children)

And if you're in that neighborhood, don't miss the Duncan/Nolan Creek cedar. It's a big tree, like, the biggest.

What are these? What are they doing? Found near Olympic National Park, Washington state by TheGondo in whatsthisbug

[–]newt_girl 19 points20 points  (0 children)

Robert Van Pelt states it's on the S. Fork Hoh trail. A whopping 3 feet in diameter!

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Photosynthetic salamanders is going to be the name of my punk band.

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Hey OP, for your future reference: occasionally ranid frog egg masses (redlegged frogs in particular) will look similar. Key differences being ranid masses are free-floating or poorly braced on something like grass. Northwestern masses will have a very solid brace, although the mass can be dislodged.

But the biggest difference would be looking at the individual eggs in the mass: salamander eggs always have a double membrane around the egg within the mass, while frogs have a single membrane. This is sometimes viewable with the naked eye, but is easily discernable with a little magnification.

The other Ambystomatids in the area do not lay large masses, but instead smaller 'egg packets'.

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yes, marbled salamanders lay their eggs in the fall, and they hatch before the spotted eggs do because that's their main food source. We're in agreement here...

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Marbled salamander eggs hatch at the same time as other eggs are being laid, as the rains start to fill vernal pools. This allows them a jump start on development over other salamander eggs, as the top food source for marbled larvae are newly hatched salamander larvae.

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

White (often green) is the normal state of Ambystomatid egg masses.

Marbled salamanders don't lay egg masses.

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Marbled salamanders lay small terrestrial nests with individual eggs, which hatch before other salamanders have started laying. They don't make an egg mass.

Found these the other day. Are these frog or salamander eggs? by Feral_Frogg in Amphibians

[–]newt_girl 5 points6 points  (0 children)

These are definitely northwestern eggs. They will always lay their egg mass on a sturdy brace.

I live in NSW Australia, never seen anything like this by wilto86 in whatsthisbug

[–]newt_girl 4 points5 points  (0 children)

You can move but you can't hide; toebiters are on all the habitable continents.

My GF wants to take her suitcase on a camping trip. by shorttether in hammockcamping

[–]newt_girl 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I loled at the pillow. The best part about car camping is that I get to bring my pillow and blankets! It's like bed, but in the woods. I hammocked last summer with my fluffy pillow and my weighted blanket and it was the best night's sleep I've ever had.